University Catalog - Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Program
Accreditation
Preparatory Requirements
Admission Requirements
Scholarships
Application Process
Veterinary Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program
Veterinary Clinical Sciences
Veterinary Pathobiology

College Administration
Chris Ross, DVM, PhD—Interim Dean
Margi Gilmour, DVM
Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Jerry Malayer, PhD—Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education

Campus Address and Phone:
205 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078
405.744.6651, Fax: 405.744.6633
Website: www.cvhs.okstate.edu


Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Program
A primary objective of the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences is to educate veterinarians for private practice. In addition, the professional curriculum provides an excellent basic biomedical education and training in diagnosis, disease prevention, medical treatment and surgery. Graduates are qualified to pursue careers in many facets of veterinary medicine and health-related professions.

Accreditation
The College has full academic accreditation status approved by the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Accreditation is based on an assessment of 11 essential factors, namely, the college's organization, its finances, facilities and equipment, clinical resources, library and learning resources, enrollment, admissions, faculty, curriculum, continuing and post-graduate education, and research.

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Preparatory Requirements
In preparation for the professional DVM training the student must complete both prescribed and elective collegiate courses. The minimum prescribed preparatory studies, totaling 64 semester hours of undergraduate course work, can be completed in three calendar years. Most of the entering veterinary medical students in recent years have had three to four years of preparatory training, often earning a bach­elor's degree.

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Admission Requirements
Collegiate course requirements for entry into veterinary medical college may be completed at any accredited university or college that offers the required courses. Pre-veterinary curricula are available at Oklahoma State University through the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources and through the College of Arts and Sciences. Both offer programs of study in pre-veterinary medical sciences, which provide for the award of a bachelor's degree after successful completion of the first or second year of veterinary medical studies. 

Requests for information on pre-veterinary medical study programs and applications for admission to such programs should be addressed to the dean of either the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources or the College of Arts and Sciences.
 
Listed below are the minimum course prerequisites for consideration for admission to the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences: 
 
English —nine semester hours including six hours of composition and three hours of an English elective. Course work in speech or technical writing is encouraged. 
 
Chemistry—general inorganic chemistry including labs (9 hours); an organic chemistry series (8 semester hours) designed for pre-veterinary and pre-medical students that includes both the aliphatic and aromatic compounds or survey course with lab (5-8 hours); and 3 semester hours of biochemistry. 
 
Physics—Eight hours of general physics.
 
Mathematics—three semester hours. Minimum level of college algebra or higher math. Course work in statistics is not acceptable.
 
Biological science—16 semester hours. Courses in zoology, general biology, microbiology and genetics are required. These courses must include laboratory work. 
 
Animal Nutrition—three semester hours of the basic principles of animal nutrition, including digestion, absorption and metabolism of the various food nutrients and ration formulation. Courses in human nutrition are not acceptable.
 
Humanities and social science—six semester hours.
 
Business electives—although not required, courses in business are encouraged.
 
The information on admission requirements was current at the time of publication but is subject to change. The admission requirements are under annual review and changes may be made at any time.

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Scholarships
The College has scholarships which may be available to matriculating veterinary medicine students; most are based on academic achievement.

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Application Process
Admission is competitive and enrollment in veterinary medicine is restricted. Applications for admission must be submitted by September 15th, and a new class enters the College each year at the beginning of the subsequent fall ­semester. 

Applicants who are legal residents of Oklahoma will be given first priority. In addition, a limited number of nonresidents will be selected. Questions about residency should be directed to the Office of the Registrar, Oklahoma State University. Requests for application materials should be directed to the Student Services Office, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. 
 
Students are admitted as candidates for the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree on the basis of records of academic performance in preparatory studies, GRE test, and references to determine personal characteristics and career motivation. Details concerning admissions procedures are available via the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences website www.cvhs.okstate.edu
 
The veterinary curriculum extends over four calendar years. The first two academic years conform to the normal semester system of the University. The last two academic years are continuous, with the fourth starting shortly after completion of the third. The fourth year is clinical in nature and classes are primarily in the Boren Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital. The fourth year is organized into three-week rotations to provide for lower faculty-student ratio and more efficient use of clinical facilities and resources.

Veterinary Medical Research Scholars
Thanks to opportunities in research for veterinary students at OSU, those receiving degrees can qualify for ‘veterinary medical research scholar designation’ on the transcript, a valuable designation to achieve. To be considered, the student must:

a. For a minimum of two semesters or in full-time summer employment, be engaged in and contribute substantively to research or creative inquiry with a faculty mentor and/or faculty-led team.  The supervising mentor may be employed at Oklahoma State University or at another university.
 
b. Present his or her research or creativity project at a state, regional or national conference or juried artistic venues such as art exhibitions, concerts, or festivals; 
 
c. Publish his or her work or a manuscript related to the creativity product in a refereed research or professional journal (or have it accepted for publication). 
 
Applicants should apply through the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences and Recognition at least six weeks before the end of their studies at OSU.  A committee appointed by the Faculty Council will examine the materials and determine whether or not the candidate will be approved and recognized.
 
For further information contact the office at 405.744.6595 or email chris.ross@okstate.edu.

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Veterinary Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program
Pamela Lloyd, PhD—Associate Professor and Coordinator of Graduate Studies

The veterinary biomedical sciences (VBS) graduate program is a multidisciplinary program intended to provide students a broad base of research areas to address individual student interests. The program is administered within the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences but may involve faculty from other colleges. Programs of research and study leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy are available within the broad areas of focus: infectious diseases, pathobiology, and physiological sciences. The program is designed to prepare individuals for careers in teaching and research, and specialization is possible within each area dependent upon student and faculty interests and available funding.

Current areas of research focus include molecular, cell and developmental biology, clinical sciences (including laser applications and oncology); infectious and parasitic diseases (including vector-borne diseases, bacterial and viral diseases in wild and domestic animals); pathobiology; and toxicology. Faculty and their specific areas of interest are available through the graduate coordinator (vbsc@okstate.edu) or online at cvhs.okstate.edu/Graduate Program.
 
Prerequisites: Candidates for admission must possess a bachelor's degree or equivalent, with a background in biological or physical sciences. Although there are no absolute performance level requirements, applicants with quantitative GRE scores at the 75th percentile or greater and GPAs of 3.0 (out of 4.0) or greater, will receive strongest consideration. 
 
The Master of Science Degree. The MS may be earned with 30 credit hours beyond a bachelor's degree or 21 hours beyond the DVM degree, including not more than six credit hours for the thesis. The plan of study is designed to meet the student's needs and interests and typically includes two credits of seminar, one course in statistics, and courses in molecular or cell biology and  pathophysiology. The student must also pass a final oral examination covering the thesis and related course work.
 
The Doctor of Philosophy Degree. The PhD requires a minimum of 60 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree or DVM degree, including up to 45 credit hours for research and dissertation. The plan of study is designed to meet the student's needs and interests and typically includes courses in cell and molecular biology, pathophysiology, statistics and seminar. Written and oral qualifying examinations are required. Students must prepare a research proposal and complete and defend a dissertation based on original research.
 
Application Procedure: Applications are made to the Graduate College (http://www.gradcollege.okstate.edu/apply) and are accepted at any time; however, all documents should be received prior to March 1st for admission to the fall semester. Applicants are required to submit official transcripts of all college-level work and scores for the GRE general test. International applicants are required to take an English proficiency exam TOEFL or equivalent exam, unless a student is from a country where English is a first language. For students seeking graduate teaching assistantships, a score of 22 or greater on speaking part of the internet-based TOEFL (ibT) is required. In addition, the applicant will submit a statement of purpose stating their preparation for graduate study as well as how earning a graduate degree will further their educational and career goals and will have three persons knowledgeable of their preparation for graduate study write and submit letters of reference. 
 
Information about faculty research interests is available upon request to the graduate coordinator (vbsc@okstate.edu). After acceptance to the graduate program, students select a major professor and an advisory committee and develop a plan of study consistent with the VBS graduate program requirements and subject to approval of the dean of the Graduate College.
 
Assistantships: A limited number of graduate teaching and research assistantships are available.
 
Internship and Residency Programs: Internships and residency programs in clinical medicine and surgery are offered through the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Residency programs in pathology are offered through the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology.

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Veterinary Clinical Sciences
G. Reed Holyoak, DVM, PhD, DACT—Bullock Professor and Department Head

Internship and Residency Programs. The department offers graduate professional programs (internships and residencies). Internships are one-year post-DVM clinical programs in small or large animal medicine and surgery.
 
Internships are designed in part to prepare students for residencies or graduate academic programs. Currently internships are offered in small animal medicine and surgery rotating, equine internal medicine and surgery rotating, theriogenology, food animal medicine and surgery, zoological medicine, and diagnostic imaging. 
 
Residencies are three-year clinical programs in various disciplines designed in part to prepare for specialty board certification. Currently, residencies are offered in small animal surgery, small animal internal medicine, equine internal medicine, equine surgery, food animal medicine and surgery, ophthalmology, and theriogenology. Graduate academic programs may be available in association with residencies.
 
Application Procedure. Applications are accepted at any time and are considered as positions become available. Most open positions are listed in the Veterinary Internship/Residency Matching Program at www.virmp.org.

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Veterinary Pathobiology
Jerry Ritchey, DVM, PhD, DACVP—Professor and Department Head

Residency Coordinators: Dr. Melanie A. Breshears, Anatomic Residency Coordinator and Dr. James H. Meinkoth, Clinical Residency Coordinator

Residency programs in anatomic and clinical veterinary pathology are offered. Candidates must have the DVM degree or equivalent. The anatomic and clinical pathology residency programs are three years with options to enter into the PhD program. The programs are designed for those interested in diagnostic veterinary pathology and board certification by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Residency training occurs through the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital and through the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. The program involves extensive diagnostic casework on primarily domestic animals and includes weekly case conferences and seminars. In addition, abundant archived materials are available for the specialty board preparation. 
 
Application Procedure. Usually one new residency training position is available each year in anatomic pathology and two of every three years in clinical pathology. Open positions are listed at the ACVP website (https://www.acvp.org/) and typically in the “Educational Opportunities” section of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

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