University Catalog - Graduate College

Graduate Students
The Graduate School
Organization of the Graduate College
Accreditation
Services for Graduate Students
Funding your Graduate Education
Admission to the Graduate College
Enrollment Policies
Academic Regulations
Graduate Programs Offered at OSU
Graduate Certificate Programs
Graduate Minors
Master's Degree Programs
Specialist in Education Degree Program (EdS)
Doctor of Education Degree Programs (EdD)
Doctor of Philosophy Degree Programs (PhD)

College Administration
Sheryl Tucker, PhD—Associate Provost and Dean
Jean Van Delinder, PhD—Senior Associate Dean
Ken Clinkenbeard, PhD, DVM—Associate Dean

Campus Address and Phone:
202 Whitehurst, Stillwater, OK 74078
(Admissions); 405.744.6368; Fax: 405.744.0355
Website: gradcollege.okstate.edu E-mail: gradi@okstate.edu

Graduate education at Oklahoma State University (OSU) is organized around the scholarly pursuit of new knowledge, both through didactic instruction and through independent and group research conducted utilizing the facilities and resources of a major research university. OSU's national and international reputation is grounded in the scholarly research and creative work performed by faculty and students under the auspices of OSU’s graduate programs.
 
The first graduate degree was conferred by OSU in 1912, and the Graduate School was organized in 1929. OSU offers more than 200 graduate degree programs, including several interdisciplinary and joint-degree programs.

1.0 OVERVIEW

1.1 Graduate Students.
Over 4,500 graduate students currently study at OSU. Part of OSU’s mission as a Land Grant University is to serve the people of the region, the state, the nation, and the world by making a first-class education available to all. In response to the growing diversity and demographic changes in the state and in the nation, OSU is committed to preparing graduates to live and work in a culturally pluralistic world. The Graduate College is proud of the diversity of its graduate student population and of their contributions to both the generation and dissemination of new knowledge through their involvement in the university’s research and instructional programs. Numerous multicultural student organizations on campus provide information and support to international and diverse students to assist in the successful completion of their graduate studies.

1.2 The Graduate College.
The Graduate College supervises all graduate work offered by the university. Professional degrees are offered through the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences and the Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. The Graduate College sets standards for admission to graduate standing and recommends to the Board of Regents for degrees those students who have completed work required for graduation.

In addition, the Graduate College offers a number of student services and professional preparation opportunities specifically designed for graduate student success while at OSU as well as after graduation. These activities include graduate teaching assistant orientation programs, three minute oral communication competition and thesis/dissertation writing workshops.

1.3 Graduate College Memberships.
The Graduate College is a member of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS), the Conference of Southern Graduate Schools (CSGS), and the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS). 

1.4 Organization of the Graduate College.
Consistent with its objective of maintaining the highest standards in graduate education, the Graduate College administers the policies and procedures specified and established by the Graduate Faculty, Board of Regents for the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Colleges and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. The Dean of the Graduate College is the senior administrator of the College as well as the dean for graduate students. The Graduate Council is the executive committee of the Graduate Faculty; it is elected by the Graduate Faculty to work with the Dean of the Graduate College in the development and administration of applicable policy. The Graduate Council formulates and reviews policies concerning the conduct of graduate study at OSU, and it participates in the periodic review of graduate programs. All proposed policies and requests related to the initiation and development of graduate curricular offerings and programs are referred to the Graduate Council for review, comment, and approval.

1.5 Accreditation.
OSU is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. (HLC, 30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504; ph 1.800.621.7440; www.hlcommission.org). Several programs within the disciplinary colleges are also accredited by other agencies; see "Accreditation" in “The University” section of the Catalog.

1.6 General Regulations.
Full authority on all academic decisions within the Graduate College rests with the dean of the Graduate College. The Graduate College policies and procedures described in the Catalog are for informational purposes. They are subject to regular review and may be revised at any time by the dean of the Graduate College in consultation with the Graduate Council.

1.7 Responsibilities.
All graduate students are expected to read and to comply with the written regulations of their graduate programs and disciplinary college as well as the Graduate College and University. The regulations presented in the Catalog may be supplemented by written departmental or program requirements available at departmental offices and/or website. Admission to a specific graduate program obligates the student to understand and adhere to the policies of that program. 

General regulations in the following sections relate to requirements for admission, enrollment and academic standing. Subsequent sections outline requirements for the following credentials: Graduate Certificate, Master’s, Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Particular attention should be given to timing and substantive requirements for matriculation, especially admission, the Plan of Study, residency, language proficiency, research, dissertation/thesis/creative component report, and graduation. The regulations are prescribed by the Graduate Council with the intent of assuring high-quality graduate programs and effective interaction of Graduate Faculty members and graduate students. 

1.8 Email as Official Correspondence.
OSU uses the institutional O-Key email address as an official means of communication from OSU faculty, staff, and administrators to students. All students have an official OSU email address that is activated when they set up their O-Key account. Students are expected to activate and check their OSU email on a frequent and consistent basis to remain informed of their official university business and are expected to ensure that adequate email space is available to receive messages.

1.9  Tuition and Fees. Refer to the Tuition, Fees and Cost Estimates” section in the Catalog.

1.10 Exception Request
Any request for a waiver of, exception to, or deviation from, any requirement set forth in the “Graduate College” section of the Catalog must be in the form of a written petition to the dean of the Graduate College. Such petitions should include a supporting letter from the faculty adviser or program coordinator.

2.0 Services for Graduate Students.

For a complete list of university services, please visit the “Current Student Resources” link on the Graduate College website (http://gradcollege.okstate.edu) or the “Student Life” link on the OSU website (http://go.okstate.edu).

Graduate and Professional Student Government Association
The Graduate and Professional Student Government Association (GPSGA) is an official advisory body to the University President and dean of the Graduate College and serves as the representative voice for graduate and professional students at OSU. Its mission is to improve all aspects of post-graduate education and student life at OSU.

The Association provides for representation from each graduate and professional degree program. Representatives are nominated by the graduate programs with membership conferred by the GPSGA president. Each representative is appointed for a term of one year; a representative must be in good academic standing and enrolled in at least two graduate credit hours.
 
The GPSGA provides funds for graduate and professional student organizations and travel grants to help students defray costs incurred by attending and presenting at professional meetings. For more information consult gpsga.okstate.edu.

3.0 Funding your Graduate Education

3.1 General Financial Aid.
One of the most common sources of funding for graduate students is graduate assistantships. Graduate teaching and research assistantships support OSU’s instructional and scholarly activities. Most academic programs routinely evaluate graduate admission applications not only for admission consideration but also for the possibility of assistantship offers. The graduate program will contact newly admitted students to inform them if a funding offer is available. These awards assist students in paying for their graduate education and also offer opportunities to gain valuable skills and experience in their discipline and as a professional. 

3.2 Federal Financial Aid.
All domestic students who want to qualify for federal financial aid should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students are encouraged to complete the FAFSA annually as soon after January 1 as possible to receive aid for the subsequent academic year. The FAFSA is available at www.fafsa.ed.gov.

3.3 OSU Short-Term Emergency Loans.
In addition to potential federal loans that may be awarded based on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), OSU assists students in need of immediate funds through the Short-Term Emergency Loan Program. This program is designed to help OSU students who are currently enrolled and attending classes to meet educationally-related off-campus unexpected expenses. The program is not designed to pay a debt owed to OSU. Qualified students may borrow up to $300 less a $10 service charge one time per semester. Additional information about the Short-Term Emergency Loan Program can be found at https://financialaid.okstate.edu/aid/loans/stl.

3.4 Graduate Assistants.
OSU recognizes two types of graduate assistants for students enrolled in master's, specialist and doctoral degree programs. Students in graduate certificates and non-degree seeking students are not eligible for GTA or GRA positions or associated benefits.

•    A Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) must be admitted to and meet the requirements of the Graduate College, be fully admitted to a graduate degree program, enrolled, and be under the supervision of an appropriate graduate faculty member. In consultation with the supervisor, the GTA works to gain instructional skills and an increased understanding of the discipline. The GTA is provided a stipend and their primary responsibilities are to support the University’s instructional mission.  Services provided by a GTA may include: classroom or laboratory teaching; advising and mentoring of students; proctoring examinations; grading papers, homework, and/or projects; accompanying/coaching musical or vocal performances, providing artistic instruction or assisting with preparation and management of materials and programs that are utilized in imparting knowledge or in the instructional process; or providing other general assistance in the instruction process.  A GTA may be assigned primary responsibilities in an extension, outreach, or service role for which those responsibilities support the instructional mission of the University. GTAs may not be given duties to support faculty research or those primarily clerical in nature. 
 
•    A Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) must be admitted to and meet the requirements of the Graduate College, be fully admitted to a graduate degree program, enrolled, and be under the supervision of an appropriate graduate faculty member.  A GRA is provided a stipend and their primary responsibilities are to provide general support to the University’s research mission.  These responsibilities may or may not relate directly to the student’s thesis or dissertation.  Duties of the GRA primarily involve applying and mastering research concepts, practices, or methods of scholarship.  Services provided by a GRA may include: assisting faculty members in a research or creative activity; perform degree-related professional or administrative services that supports research, instruction, professional development, or outreach missions of the University; developing and evaluating instructional materials or curricula; or assuming responsibility for designated scholarly endeavors.  
 
“Perform degree-related professional or administrative services” does not include jobs that are outside the student’s field of study.
 
Assistantship inquiries should be addressed to the unit head or graduate program coordinator of the unit/department/school/program in which the appointment is desired. The service expected is governed by the terms of the appointment.

3.5 Graduate Assistantship Responsibilities.
An offer of an assistantship is a commitment by a unit/department/school/program to provide financial support to admitted graduate students. Assistantships are an investment made by a unit/department/school/program and are granted primarily to enable the student to pursue an advanced degree and gain valuable experience. Accepting an assistantship brings with it a professional obligation to fulfill all of the responsibilities associated with the assistantship assignment. Included in this professional obligation is the expectation that students who have accepted an assistantship will diligently pursue their degree to completion. In recognition of this commitment and to provide adequate time for students holding assistantships to devote to study, employment as a graduate assistant is limited to a total, from all University sources (including external grants and contracts), of 0.50 FTE (an average of 20 hours per week) in the Fall and Spring semesters, and 0.75 FTE (an average of 30 hours per week) between the end of the Spring semester and the beginning of the Fall semester. Exceptions to this limitation may be requested by the employing unit or graduate program to the dean of the Graduate College.

A student with an 0.50 FTE assistantship is expected to devote, on average, 20 hours per week to their duties as a graduate teaching or research assistant; the remainder of academic effort is devoted to his/her own studies and research.  The time devoted to the assistantship may vary from day to day and week to week as long as it does not exceed the average given above. 
 
As part of a graduate student’s educational experience, OSU makes a number of GRAs available on a routine basis.  Graduate students on a GRA are expected to devote full-time effort to their graduate programs. While the GRA appointment provides a modest stipend for an average of 10 or 20 hours per week for a 0.25 or a 0.50 FTE assignment, respectively, in recognition of contributions to the OSU research enterprise, it does not indicate that no additional time and effort may be required of the graduate student who is actively pursuing a graduate research degree. Depending on the stage of the research project and the graduate student’s advancement in the program, the student may be enrolled in research credit hours for academic credit or only enrolled in formal coursework. Irrespective of that enrollment, it is expected that the graduate student is working full-time toward completion of the advanced degree. OSU, like most institutions nationwide, does not define the research credit hour as equating to a specific amount of time and effort, as the nature of research is highly dependent on the individual’s progress on the project. For instance, general OSU policy only requires a minimum enrollment in two credit hours when a graduate student is working on a research project and using OSU resources unless they are employed as a GTA/GRA..
 
In addition, all students holding a graduate assistantship are required to be full-time students - see “Enrollment Requirements” below.  For Fall and Spring semesters, students employed 0.50 FTE must be enrolled in at least six credit hours to be considered full-time, while students employed less than 0.50 FTE must be enrolled in at least nine credit hours to be considered full-time.  However, full-time enrollment for students admitted to doctoral candidacy is two credit hours.  For the summer term, students employed at any level must be enrolled in at least two credit hours during any summer session to be considered full-time.
 
International students who are dependent upon an assistantship for their financial guarantee must remember that forfeiture of that assistantship may require the re-submission of a newly revised financial guarantee to the Office of International Students and Scholars. Students who forfeit their graduate assistantships risk rescission of tuition waivers, as well as any health insurance coverage for graduate assistants provided by the University.
 
Note that all graduate student benefit programs, such as tuition waivers, are only available to individuals with a primary classification as a graduate student enrolled in a degree program, which does not include certificate-seeking or non-degree seeking graduate students.  OSU employees taking graduate classes do not qualify for graduate student benefit programs, irrespective of whether their employment is a benefit eligible position.  One cannot selectively opt-out of certain benefits to seek eligibility for other benefits.  Please contact the Graduate College or Human Resources if you have questions.
 
3.6 Graduate Assistant General Benefits. GTAs and GRAs employed at least 0.50 FTE in the fall/spring semester (average of 20 hours per week) are enrolled in a minimum of six (or two for doctoral candidates) eligible graduate hours will receive a tuition waiver (hours of enrollment must be required per the graduate degree program).  Summer tuition waivers for the same GTA or GRA for spring semester will apply during the summer regardless of summer employment.  Tuition waivers cannot be applied to independent study, leveling, undergraduate or outreach type courses. Granting of these tuition waivers is also contingent upon the student submitting an electronic GTA/GRA (GSSI) tuition waiver agreement through the Graduate College website (http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/FormsPage), by the first day of the semester, in which they acknowledge their employment, enrollment and good academic standing responsibilities. Once enrolled, good academic standing (i.e., not on academic probation – beyond probationary admission) is a requirement for OSU tuition waiver eligibility. Once matriculated, a graduate student going on probation is not eligible for tuition waiver benefits. This does not preclude a GTA/GRA appointment(s). Graduate programs can request a one-time exception for exceptional circumstances from the graduate dean.  For more information regarding tuition waiver benefits or academic standing, please visit the Graduate College website (gradcollege.okstate.edu). 
Any graduate student employed as a GTA and/or a GRA less than 0.50 FTE total per week will not be eligible for any type of tuition waiver benefit. 

3.6.1 Health Insurance Benefits.
Graduate Teaching or Research Assistants employed in a 0.25 FTE GTA/GRA position during the fall or spring semesters and who are enrolled in at least six graduate credit hours throughout that entire semester are eligible for single-person-coverage health insurance through OSU for the fall semester in question.  Note: Spring semester eligibility coverage continues through the following summer regardless of employment or enrollment status.

GTA/GRAs who are not eligible for health insurance coverage during the summer session by virtue of their eligibility during the previous spring semester but who are employed in a 0.25 FTE GTA/GRA position during the eight-week summer session and enrolled in at least two graduate credit hours are eligible for single-person-coverage health insurance through OSU for the summer term.
The University provides the student's coverage on a semester-by-semester basis. Students receiving the GTA/GRA insurance are required to pay the semester health fee. Coverage is through Academic Health Plans, Inc., Information on the policy is available at www.academichealthplans.com, the Graduate College or University Health Services.

3.7 Health Insurance for International Students.
The Oklahoma State University Board of Regents requires that all visa-holding (i.e. non-immigrant) students at OSU be covered by health insurance. The OSU Student Insurance Policy is the recommended health insurance and will be billed to all non-immigrant student accounts automatically.  Payment for the student insurance is included in the costs listed on the financial affidavit that international students are required to submit to receive a F-1 or J-1 visa.

The insurance premium can be waived for non-immigrant students sponsored by the United States Government, a foreign government recognized by the United States of America, or certain international, government sponsored or non-governmental organizations. Such waivers will be based on the government or organization guaranteeing payment of all health care expenses including evacuation and repatriation. 
 
The insurance premium will also be waived for students who provide documented evidence of health insurance coverage by an employer. Nonimmigrant students employed by OSU and eligible for both employer-provided insurance and international student health insurance may select between the two, as long as the insurance selected includes evacuation and repatriation coverage.
 
Students covered by a private medical insurance plan with benefits comparable to or better than the OSU plan, may request a waiver from OSU’s international student health insurance requirement. Coverage must be in effect from the first day of their first semester classes for a 12 month period.  
 
To use alternate insurance, students must complete and submit a waiver request no later than the fifth day of classes.  Waiver forms can be found on the International Students and Scholars (ISS) website at http://iss.okstate.edu.
 
If a student holds an appointment as at least a 0.25 FTE OSU GTA or GRA position, OSU provides the student health insurance policy.

3.8 McNair Graduate Fellowships for former McNair Scholars.
Entering graduate students who are graduates of a McNair Scholar Program as an undergraduate may be eligible to become McNair Graduate Fellows. McNair Graduate Fellows receive a tuition waiver for all degree-eligible courses up to the number of hours in their degree program, irrespective of a qualifying assistantship. Such tuition waivers cannot apply to independent study, leveling, or outreach-type courses.  The McNair Graduate Fellow Tuition Waiver Program is competitive and is not a guaranteed, irrespective of the application waiver received. Please contact the Graduate College (gradi@okstate.edu) for more information as restrictions apply. Also, note that all graduate student benefit programs, such as the McNair Graduate Fellow Tuition Waiver Program, are only available to individuals with a primary classification as graduate students. OSU employees taking graduate classes do not qualify for graduate student benefit programs, irrespective of whether their employment is a benefit eligible position. One cannot opt-out of certain benefits in an a-la-carte manner to seek eligibility for other benefits. Please contact the Graduate College or Human Resources if you have any additional questions. McNair Graduate Fellows are required to submit the necessary contract to the Graduate College each year and restrictions apply.

3.8.1 OSU Graduate College, City Year National Service Scholars. Oklahoma State University is proud to partner with City Year through our shared visions and values of integrating the power of knowledge and service in addressing social problems. The OSU Graduate College City Year National Service Scholars Program provides City Year Alumni an application fee waiver and a tuition waiver for all degree-eligible courses up to the number of hours in their degree program, However, acceptance as an OSU Graduate College City Year National Service Scholar is competitive and is not guaranteed. The following are program requirements: 1) Must be completing your year of service or be a senior AmeriCorps member, alumni or staff; 2) Must provide a letter of program completion from your Director of City Year Alumni and Career Services; 3) Only applies to residential graduate programs on Stillwater, Tulsa, or Center for Health Sciences campuses – no distance learning or outreach formats; 4) Graduate certificate programs are not eligible for this or other tuition benefit programs; 5) Cannot be used to earn a second graduate degree; 6) Cannot accept or have access to other tuition waiver programs, including faculty/staff programs; 7) Must participate in OSU City Year National Service Scholars Program activities; 8) OSU City Year National Service Scholars fellowship and subsequent tuition waiver is applicable to one OSU graduate degree; 9) Renewal of the OSU City Year National Service Scholars fellowship is contingent upon satisfactory progress each term; 10) See the OSU City Year National Service Scholars Fellowship Tuition Waiver Agreement for additional provisions.

3.9 Spouse Tuition Waivers.
A spouse of a graduate teaching or research assistant who is receiving a tuition waiver that is associated with an eligible assistantship is eligible to apply for a waiver of the non-resident portion of tuition for all graduate level/eligible courses taken. Tuition waivers cannot apply to independent study, leveling or outreach-type courses. Contact the Office of the Graduate College for details.
 
3.10 Student Employment.
Career Services provides assistance to OSU students seeking part-time employment or work study programs. Students are informed of job opportunities on campus and in the Stillwater community. Applications are available in room 360 Student Union. Jobs on campus usually offer 12 to 20 hours of work per week in clerical, technical, food service or general labor positions. Rate of pay and work schedules vary.
 
Individual job search assistance is available with the graduate career consultant in the Student Union Career Services Office or with any of the college career consultants located in the respective disciplinary colleges. Services include resume and curriculum vitae development, written correspondence assistance, mock interviews and interview preparation, academic and non-academic job search assistance, workshops and career fairs. More information may be found online at HireOSUgrads.com.

4.0 Admission to the Graduate College.
Holders of baccalaureate or first professional degrees from colleges and universities of recognized standing (including U.S. institutions accredited by agencies recognized by the U.S. Department of Education) are eligible to seek admission to the Graduate College. In some cases the Graduate College, in consultation with the graduate program, may require certain prerequisite courses to bring the applicant's credentials from international institutions to the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree. These "bridge" courses must be completed within a designated period of time and/or prior to enrollment beyond a prescribed number of hours of graduate course work. Applicants must complete the web-based application and submit official transcripts of all academic work and degrees received including any previous graduate coursework and degrees. No application for admission will be reviewed until the application fee is paid. 

The prospective student should obtain transcripts for bachelor’s degree(s) conferred or pending as well as for any graduate or professional course work and upload these transcripts as part of their application (some programs may require applicants to upload transcripts from all institutions previously attended). If an applicant is offered admission to graduate studies, then the applicant will be required to have the institution that granted their bachelor’s degree to send one official transcript to the Graduate College, 202 Whitehurst, Stillwater, OK 74078.
 
To be official, the transcript must be issued from the school and must show the complete scholastic record, bear the official seal of the institution, be signed by the issuing officer, and be in a sealed envelope or electronically delivered directly from the issuing institution.  
 
To assure adequate time, completed applications and transcripts should be received at least 30 days prior to the graduate program application deadline or the beginning of the semester, whichever comes first. All transcripts become the property of OSU and are not released or returned.
 
When the applicant’s file is complete, the faculty in the graduate program of the student’s area of interest reviews the material and recommends an admission status to the dean of the Graduate College. The final decision for admission to the Graduate College is determined by the dean on the basis of the graduate program’s recommendations, prior academic performance of the applicant, and availability of space, facilities, and faculty mentors in the program. 

4.1 OSU Faculty Members. No member of the faculty, with the rank of associate professor or above or equivalent rank at the time of completing the requirements, may be granted a degree or graduate certificate from this institution. This regulation also applies to faculty members in the schools of engineering holding the rank of assistant professor or above.

4.2 Types of Admission.
Admission to a graduate program at OSU is based on an evaluation of an applicant’s overall record, experience, personal qualifications, proposed area of study, and fit with the graduate program. The Graduate College does not set minimum GPA requirements and allows graduate programs to evaluate applications holistically, but generally successful graduate applicants possess a 3.00 cumulative GPA from their undergraduate and/or graduate or professional work. Academic programs may set more stringent admission requirements. Please check with the graduate program to which you are applying in order to determine any program specific requirements.

4.2.1 Admission Without Qualification. Students planning to work toward a graduate degree in a recognized graduate program may be admitted in good standing provided they meet all Graduate College and graduate program requirements.
 
4.2.2 Provisional Admission. A student can be admitted provisionally upon recommendation of the graduate program and with concurrence by the dean of the Graduate College. Admission with provisional status is granted to an applicant who does not meet one or more of the graduate program’s admission requirements or when the applicant does not have the necessary academic background. In this case, the graduate program requires specific provisions be met for admission in good standing. For example, a graduate program may require additional leveling coursework or higher test scores. The first obligation of a student admitted provisionally is to successfully meet all of the provisions specified at the time of admission. Failure to meet these provisions could result in the dismissal from the program.
 
4.2.3 Probation Admission. A student can be admitted with probation status upon recommendation of the graduate program with concurrence by the dean of the Graduate College. Admission with probation status is granted to an applicant who has deficiencies in previous academic course work. A student admitted on probation status must make at least a 3.00 GPA through the semester in which s/he completes nine hours of courses eligible for graduate credit. Upon successful fulfillment of these requirements the student will be granted good academic standing. Failure to meet the required level of academic performance while in a probationary status may result in dismissal from the Graduate College.
 
4.2.4 Conditional Admission. Several graduate programs at OSU will consider an applicant for conditional admission.  An applicant can be admitted conditionally upon recommendation of the graduate program and with concurrence by the dean of the Graduate College. Conditional admission means that the applicant is academically qualified for admission to the graduate degree program but lacks a minimum TOEFL or IELTS score which satisfies the University’s or graduate program’s minimum (see “International Student Admission” for minimum requirements). Before the applicant will be allowed to matriculate in the graduate degree program, a sufficient TOEFL or IELTS score must be submitted.  Failure to submit a sufficient TOEFL or IELTS score will result in the applicant not being allowed to enroll.
 
4.3 Non-Degree Seeking Student Status.  An applicant may be admitted to the Graduate College as a non-degree seeking student if he or she does not have immediate plans to become a degree candidate, but wants to take graduate courses, prerequisites, or other courses. Admission to the Graduate College as a non-degree seeking student means only that the student will be permitted to enroll in courses through the Graduate College. It does not imply that the student has been or will be admitted to a program leading to an advanced degree or that the student will be able to obtain a graduate degree from OSU. Non-degree seeking students are not eligible for GTA or GRA positions or associated tuition waiver benefits.

4.3.1 Non-Degree Seeking Student Status Requirements:
Non-degree seeking students are subject to the same admission standards as degree-seeking students, including English language proficiency. Applicants for non-degree seeking student status are not automatically admitted without due deliberation of their past academic performance. A non-degree seeking applicant can be considered for admission “Without Qualification” provided his/her overall GPA is 3.00 or higher for all courses on his/her bachelor’s degree transcript and/or transcripts from his/her graduate or professional coursework. An applicant whose GPA does not meet these criteria can be considered for admission after consultation and recommendation of the Graduate College’s non-degree seeking student adviser who may consider additional factors in making a decision, such as the following:
 
•    Length of time since last attendance at an institution of higher learning,
•    A written appeal from the applicant explaining exceptional circumstances that warrant admission, and/or
•    A letter of recommendation written by faculty who can speak to the applicant’s potential for graduate work.
 
The prospective student is responsible for filing a new application for admission to the Graduate College should he or she wish to become a degree-seeking candidate. The new application will be evaluated by the graduate program and the dean of the Graduate College to ascertain admissibility to the degree program.
 
Given that non-degree seeking coursework is not guided by a Plan of Study or approved by an adviser, no more than nine semester credit hours of course work taken while a non-degree seeking student may be used on a Plan of Study to meet requirements for a graduate degree or graduate certificate program. In addition, only three semester credit hours of course work taken while a non-degree seeking student may be used on a Plan of Study toward an MBA degree. Non-degree seeking students may not enroll in more than nine hours of courses eligible for graduate credit without permission of the dean of the Graduate College, or their designee. To ensure that non-degree seeking students do not inadvertently exceed this limitation, an enrollment hold will be placed on each student in this status after the student has registered for six or more hours. This hold may be removed by the Graduate College (see below) once the student has formally re-acknowledged this nine-hour limitation.
 
Non-degree seeking students are subject to the same academic regulations as those graduate students admitted into degree programs. Such students are strongly encouraged to consult with the instructor of any course in which they intend to enroll in order to ensure that they are adequately prepared for that course.
 
Non-degree seeking students may not enroll in thesis (5000) or dissertation (6000) courses.
 
Generally, International students with an F-1 visa, except students on OPT or OCT, may not be admitted or enroll as non-degree seeking students. 
 
Academic advising for non-degree seeking student is provided by an adviser in the Graduate College. Students should contact the Graduate College at 405.744.6368 or gradi@okstate.edu for details.
 

4.4 International Student Admission.
International applicants are expected to submit applications, financial affidavits, transcripts and/or mark sheets, and, if required, official scores of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examinations by February 1 for fall enrollment and by August 1 for spring enrollment. Applications that become complete after these deadline dates  may be reviewed, but the Graduate College cannot guarantee an admissions decision will be made with sufficient time for the issuance of the I-20 form required to obtain an entry Visa.

4.4.1 English Proficiency. As a condition of admission to graduate study at OSU, all persons for whom English is a second language are required to present proof of English competency regardless of the number of semesters or terms completed at OSU or in other institutions of higher education. A waiver of this requirement can be obtained for students who have completed a baccalaureate or graduate degree from an accredited institution of higher learning, at which English is the primary language of instruction, located in a country in which English is a recognized primary language. Note, however, that proof of specific English proficiency through the submission of test scores, such as the Internet Based TOEFL (iBT) scores, or additional testing may be still necessary if employment as a graduate teaching assistant is desired. Graduate programs may have additional requirements.
 
Proof of English competency can be in the form of an official TOEFL or IELTS, (academic stream), score.  Either examination must have been taken within the last two years. Applicants who present evidence of undue hardship or other extremely extenuating circumstances may be admitted without a TOEFL or IELTS score. However, such students will be required to take the Test of English Language Proficiency (TELP) immediately upon arrival at OSU, and to comply with the provisions associated with that test.
 
Applicants who present a TOEFL score of at least 79 iBT/550 PBT or an IELTS academic stream score of at least 6.5 satisfy the Graduate College's English proficiency requirements for admission to a graduate program. Note that some graduate programs require a TOEFL score above these levels, and applicants should contact the program for specific TOEFL or IELTS requirements.
 
Applicants who present a TOEFL score of at least 61 iBT/500 PBT, but less than 79 iBT/550 PBT (or an IELTS academic stream score of 6.0) and who demonstrate unusual academic promise may be admitted to graduate study on conditional status upon petition to the Graduate College by the graduate program.
 
Applicants with a TOEFL score of at least 61 iBT/500 PBT, but less than 79 iBT/550 PBT (or an IELTS academic stream score of 6.0), must successfully complete a minimum of 12 weeks of study at an intensive English program (IEP) approved by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education State Regents. At least two-thirds (eight weeks) of the 12 weeks must be instruction at an advanced level. A list of State Regents’ approved IEPs can be found in the OSRHE Academic Affairs Procedures Handbook. The OSU intensive English program, known as the English Language Institute (ELI), is a state-approved IEP. More information on the OSU ELI program can be found here https://eli.okstate.edu/
 
Applicants, who do not submit a TOEFL/IELTS score, can seek admission to the OSU English Language Institute (ELI) in their first semester. These students will be issued an I-20 by ELI. After achieving the required score (500) and immediately prior to admission, the applicant must successfully complete a minimum of 12 weeks of study at an intensive English program (IEP) approved by the State Regents as described above. Upon successful completion of the ELI program students will be issued an I-20 by the Office of International Students and Scholars and will be admitted into their graduate degree program. Such students will be required to take the institutional TELP (see below) at the first opportunity thereafter and to comply with its provisions. Students must continue to enroll in ELI until their successful completion. Concurrent enrollment in graduate courses and ELI is not permitted.
 
Students who submit TOEFL scores from the iBT for reading, listening and writing shall also be evaluated to determine if additional course work is needed.
 
Students who submit TOEFL scores and who score at least 42 on the combined reading and listening portions, with a score of at least 20 in each section, are not required to enroll in any English language proficiency courses. Students who score less than this on the reading and listening portions of the iBT (irrespective of the score on the written portion) are required to enroll in ENGL 0003 during their first semester. ENGL 0003 carries a grade of S/U and may not be used toward minimum degree requirements. Students must enroll in ENGL 0003 each semester until a grade of S is earned. Students who complete ENGL 0003 and who have a score less than 22 on the writing portion of the iBT are also encouraged to enroll in ENGL 4893*.

Students who score at or above the minimum score(s) on the reading and listening portion of the TOEFL, but less than 22 on the writing portion, are required to enroll in ENGL 4893* at some point in their studies. ENGL 4893* carries graduate credit and may be used toward minimum degree requirements; a grade of B or better in this course is required.

In situations when the student is required to take ENGL 0003 or ENGL 4893*, the appropriate course must be listed on the student's Plan of Study and becomes part of degree completion requirements.
 

4.4.2 Test of English Language Proficiency. Students for whom English is not their native language and who submit a PBT (paper-based test) version of the TOEFL, or who take the IELTS, must take the Test of English Language Proficiency (TELP) upon arrival at OSU and comply with the provisions associated with that test. The TELP is administered on the Stillwater and Tulsa campuses before each regular semester through University Testing and Assessment. A waiver of the TELP requirement will be granted to a student who has:
 
1.    achieved a score of 600 PBT or higher and a score of 5.0 or higher on the Test of Written English (TWE) or Essay; or
 
2.    achieved an IELTS, (academic stream), overall band score of 6.5 or higher on each of the band scores for Listening, Reading and Writing. 
 
A score of 70 on both portions of the TELP is considered passing. Students who score less than 70 on the Listening/Dictation portion of the TELP (irrespective of the score on the writing portion) are required to enroll in ENGL 0003 during their first semester. ENGL 0003 carries a grade of S/U and may not be used toward minimum degree requirements. Students must enroll in ENGL 0003 each semester until a grade of S is earned.
 
Students who score at least 70 on the Listening/Dictation portion of the TELP, but less than 70 on the Writing portion are required to enroll in ENGL 4893* at some point in their studies. ENGL 4893* carries graduate credit and may be used toward minimum degree requirements; a grade of “B” or better in this course is required. In situations when the student is required to take ENGL 0003 or ENGL 4893*, the appropriate course must be listed on the student's Plan of Study and becomes part of degree completion requirements. 
 
4.4.3 Spoken English Proficiency for Employment. OSU policy requires all persons for whom English is a second language to demonstrate an acceptable level of spoken English before being employed in an instructionally related capacity, including laboratory assignments. Graduate students who serve only as laboratory assistants (e.g., setting up and/or maintaining equipment) are not required to comply with these provisions. See http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/ita for specific policy requirements for the International Teaching Assistant Program. Any new international teaching assistant (ITA) is required to have a qualifying score of 26 or greater on the speaking portion of the iBT or to take the ITA test prior to being approved for instructional assignments. All new ITAs are also required to participate in the international teaching assistant orientation. See http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/ita for specific policy requirements. 
 
5.0 Transfer of Graduate Credits. Transfer credit must be recommended by the graduate student’s advisory committee through the submission of a Plan of Study that is approved by the dean of the Graduate College.
 
Transfer credit will only be considered if it was earned when the student was post-baccalaureate (i.e., after earning a bachelor’s degree) at an accredited institution and the applicable course(s) was/were certified as graduate credit by that institution. All courses used as transfer credit must have a grade of “B” or better.

Transfer of credits from medical professional programs (e.g., DO, DVM and MD) to the Graduate College may also be considered when a student was admitted to a medical professional program at another accredited institution and the applicable courses were certified for enrollment restricted to professional-level study. All courses used as transfer credit must have a grade of “B” or better or a grade of “pass” for those institutions which only offer professional courses as a “pass/no pass” grading system.

 
Up to three hours of transfer credit may be used toward an OSU graduate certificate and up to nine credit hours of transfer credit may be used toward any OSU graduate degree. A doctoral student may transfer more than nine hours if the courses in question were housed in a department or program that offers an EdD or PhD (or equivalent) degree. Doctoral students must include a minimum of 30 hours of OSU credit on their Plan of Study.
 

6.0 Enrollment Policies.
6.1 Initial and Continuous Enrollment Policy. A prospective student must enroll for courses at OSU within the time specified in his or her admission letter to retain active status. A prospective student who does not conform to these conditions must reapply for admission. 

Any student who interrupts enrollment for one year (i.e., a consecutive period of one fall semester plus one spring semester plus one summer term) must re-apply for admission, and will be subject to the regulations in effect at the time of reapplication. See section 6.6 below for additional doctoral candidacy enrollment requirements.
 
6.2 Full-Time Enrollment.
To be considered enrolled full time, a graduate student must be enrolled in at least nine hours in either fall or spring semester and at least four hours during the summer sessions. Full-time enrollment for Graduate Teaching/Research Associate/Assistants (GTAs/GRAs) with a 0.50 FTE appointment is at least six hours in either fall or spring semester and at least two hours during a summer session.
 
6.3 Minimum and Maximum Enrollment. Students are required to be enrolled in at least two credit hours in each semester in which they are using physical or faculty resources of the University. (Students holding graduate assistantships should note that additional requirements apply; see below.) Regardless of the number of hours taken, a student may not enroll in more than 12 (16 for the Spears School of Business graduate programs) credit hours in the fall or spring semester without permission of the dean of the Graduate College. During the summer session, a student may not enroll in more than nine credit hours taken in any session during the eight-week summer period. No more than three credit hours can be taken during the first summer session (intersession). Summer intersession is defined as any course that begins after the end of the spring semester and ends prior to the beginning of the eight-week summer session. For any short course session less than eight weeks in length, enrollment shall not exceed one credit hour for each week.
 
International students on F-1 or J-1 visas must maintain full-time status (as defined above) during the first semester of enrollment, and during each fall and spring semester thereafter.
 
6.4 Graduating Semester Enrollment. Each degree-seeking graduate student must be enrolled in at least two hours of courses eligible for graduate credit during their graduating semester (defined as the semester in which they satisfactorily complete all degree requirements). However, a student would not need to be enrolled during their graduating semester if they meet the following conditions: 1) has been assigned an “Incomplete” (grade of I) in a non-research or creative component course; 2) the course is required for graduation; and, 3) the course in which the incomplete was received is the only graduation requirement left to fulfill. Students must enroll in research, thesis, or dissertation hours, as appropriate, during each semester in which they are involved in research leading to a thesis or dissertation, irrespective of the number of credit hours of such courses either required or permitted for the degree.
 
6.5 Master’s Degree Enrollment Requirements. Students with a fall (spring/summer) graduating semester who have research courses (i.e., courses numbered 5000) on their approved Plan of Study must satisfactorily complete no fewer than six hours of courses eligible for graduate credit during the calendar (academic) year which includes the graduating semester. As an example, a student wishing to graduate in a fall semester must be enrolled in a total of at least six hours for that fall semester plus the preceding spring semester and summer session. Doctoral students meet this requirement by virtue of the Doctoral Candidacy Enrollment Requirements noted below.
 
6.6 Doctoral Candidacy Enrollment Requirements. Doctoral students who have completed the requirements for admission to doctoral candidacy and had their “Admission to Doctoral Candidacy” form approved by the Graduate College may enroll for a minimum of at least two credit hours during any term and be considered full-time. This post-candidacy reduced enrollment option applies to all qualified graduate students, including GTAs, GRAs, international students and veterans receiving VA benefits. A student is normally expected to enroll primarily in research hours or in program-approved courses after being admitted to doctoral candidacy.
 
Continuous enrollment post-candidacy is required of all students. Enrollment of a minimum of at least two credits per semester is required for every semester of a student’s candidacy (summer session excluded) until graduation. It is ultimately the responsibility of each student to ensure that they meet this enrollment requirement. Students who are not able to maintain active status are strongly encouraged to consult with their program, advisor and the Graduate College to determine whether requesting a Leave of Absence (LOA) is the most appropriate course of action.
 
6.6.1 Reinstatement Fee. Post-candidacy students who do not maintain continuous enrollment will be assessed a reinstatement fee based upon their residency status at the time of last enrollment as follows:
• Resident: $750/semester (summer session excluded) of non-enrollment
• Nonresident: $1,900/semester (summer session excluded) of non-enrollment
In addition to the reinstatement fee, students whose continuous enrollment disruption exceeds one academic year also must apply for readmission to the graduate program (see Enrollment). 
 
During the readmission process, previous coursework will be evaluated for applicability in accordance with coursework (10 years) and time-to-degree (9 years) time limits (see Time to Degree Requirements).
 
Notification of the conditions of readmission and reinstatement will be provided if an acceptance occurs. New program requirements may apply based on the aforementioned enrollment policy. Please note that reinstatement and readmission are not guaranteed and significant challenges may occur that hinder a student’s ability to complete a degree after a lapse in enrollment, such as the reapplication process (e.g., new letters of recommendation and unexpired standardize test scores); availability of the same graduate advisor, project and/or grant support; and new/revised program requirements and/or core courses for degree.
 
6.7 Enrollment and Financial Assistance. For the purpose of receiving monetary assistance through the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, the amount of the award is related to the total number of enrolled credit hours that apply toward the degree (for graduate students, such courses must be offered for graduate credit), including 3000*, 4000* (G sections only), 5000 and 6000 level courses. OSU graduate certificate and master’s, specialist and, doctoral degree programs are federal aid-eligible programs, depending on a person’s personal circumstances.
In general, a graduate student must be enrolled in four hours of courses eligible for graduate credit each fall and spring semester, and two hours of courses eligible for graduate credit in the summer term, to be eligible for federal financial aid. Some students may be required to enroll in more hours in the fall or spring or summer to receive the full amount of federal financial aid. Students should verify with their financial aid adviser in the OSU Office of Scholarship and Financial Aid about the number of hours they are required to take. Certifiable enrollment status, based upon a combination of enrollment and employment, only assists with the deferral of loan repayments, never qualification for aid, which is based solely on enrollment.
 
6.8 Enrollment as a Non-Degree Seeking or Graduate Student. Students with a bachelor’s degree are expected to enroll in the Graduate College unless they want to obtain another bachelor’s degree. If they enroll as an undergraduate student, the courses taken cannot be given graduate credit at a later date.
 
6.9 Graduate Student Enrollment in Undergraduate Courses. Students admitted to the Graduate College may enroll in, or audit, undergraduate courses or course sections that do not carry graduate credit if approved to do so by their graduate faculty adviser. Such courses cannot subsequently be used as part of a graduate Plan of Study and are not generally covered by graduate tuition waiver programs. Some 3000 and 4000 level courses are approved for both undergraduate and graduate credit; these courses are identified in the Course Catalog and are generally offered in separate undergraduate and graduate sections. Enrollment in such a course by a graduate student will normally be in the graduate section; additional assignments at an intellectual level commensurate with that of graduate work when compared to that required for undergraduate credit, is required to earn graduate credit. Some graduate students may, however, wish to enroll in the undergraduate sections for undergraduate credit only (e.g., to complete additional courses specified in the graduate admission provisions). They may do so by completing the “Graduate Students Seeking Undergraduate Credit for 3000/4000 Courses” form and submitting it to the Office of the Registrar by the end of the second week of the regular semester, or by the end of the first week of the summer session, in which the 3000*/4000* course is taken. Submission of this form implies that the student wishes to be graded using the same criteria and course completion requirements used for undergraduates in the course. Such courses may not subsequently be used as part of a graduate Plan of Study and are not generally covered by graduate tuition waiver programs.
 
6.10 Undergraduate Student Enrollment in Graduate Courses. An OSU undergraduate senior may take a limited number of courses for graduate credit toward an OSU degree program. The credits may not be utilized for both a baccalaureate degree and a graduate degree. The courses in question must be approved for graduate credit (denoted in the Course Catalog), and the student must enroll in the graduate section (if enrolling in a 3000 and 4000 level course). The applicability of such graduate courses to a specific graduate program will be determined by the student’s graduate advisory committee when the student enrolls in the Graduate College and submits a Plan of Study for an advanced degree.
To receive graduate credit, a Graduate Credit for Seniors form must be completed by the student to receive graduate credit for courses taken. This form must be submitted prior to the end of the second week of class instruction of a regular semester, or the first week of a regular summer session. The required form is available on the Graduate College’s website or in the Graduate College.
 
Such credit may be earned only if the following conditions are satisfied at the time of application:
1.    Students must have a minimum overall (cumulative graduation/retention) undergraduate GPA of 3.00.
2.    The total semester enrollment must not exceed 18 credit hours for a regular semester or nine credit hours for a summer session.
3.    The student must be within 12 semester credit hours of completing requirements for the baccalaureate degree at the beginning of the semester or summer session in which courses are taken for graduate credit.
4.    Admission to courses taken for graduate credit must have approval of the course instructor, the dean of the disciplinary college associated with the student’s major, and the dean of the Graduate College.
 
No more than 15 semester credit hours taken while a senior may be approved for graduate credit. The student must earn a grade of “B” or higher in those courses for which he or she seeks graduate credit. Students are cautioned that institutions other than OSU may or may not allow courses taken for graduate credit during the senior year to be transferred into one of their graduate degree programs.
 
7.0 Time to Degree.
Graduate College matriculation starts when a student first enrolls as an admitted degree seeking graduate student. That date will be used in calculating time limits for degree completion. 
Students are expected to complete the requirements for a graduate certificate, master’s, or specialist degree within seven years from first enrollment after admission to the graduate program. Students are expected to complete the requirements for a doctoral degree within nine years from first enrollment after admission to the graduate program. After that time a student must submit a written petition to the Graduate College requesting an extension of time-to-degree limits. Credit for all courses on a graduate Plan of Study must have been awarded within ten years of completion of all degree requirements. Any exception to these time limits must be approved by the dean of the Graduate College.
 
7.1 Leave of Absence. OSU graduate students are expected to maintain active status through continuous enrollment from the time they matriculate until they graduate. Students who are not able to maintain active status are strongly encouraged to consult with their program, advisor, and Graduate College to determine whether requesting a leave of absence (LOA) is the most appropriate course of action. International students must consult with the International Students and Scholars (ISS) office to ensure compliance with Federal immigration policy. Example situations that may lead a student to explore a leave of absence request are medical, personal, employment and military service. Students who do not have an approved leave of absence and are not continuously enrolled may experience negative consequences related to academic, visa, financial aid, and other student issues – see University policies and guidelines for additional information. A student status of “good standing” (academic and conduct) is generally required for a leave of absence. Please see http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/leave-of-absence-policy for additional leave of absence information.
 
8.0 Enrollment Procedure
Students are strongly encouraged to review the course offerings for the upcoming semester prior to attempting to enroll. . For more information about enrollment and classes go to http://my.okstate.edu.
First semester graduate students must first obtain their adviser's clearance prior to attempting to enroll.
 
Non-degree seeking students may be granted enrollment clearance through the Graduate College. Non-degree seeking students will be provided assistance with selecting coursework, issues surrounding the transferability of special student credits, applying to degree-seeking programs, and other academic topics.
 
If the student has not completed a Plan of Study or if this is the first semester as a graduate student, the student should consult with the graduate faculty adviser. The graduate faculty adviser can provide information about required courses, course sequencing, and other information in order to select appropriate courses. The adviser should give approval for course selections prior to enrollment. All graduate students must complete Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) requirements prior to the submission of a Plan of Study. A student should consult with his or her graduate coordinator as to what these requirements are in his or her graduate program. A Plan of Study will not be approved by the Graduate College until the program has certified RCR completion.
 
If a Plan of Study has been completed, the student should verify that all planned courses are listed on the Plan of Study. Students should consult with their adviser any time they deviate from courses listed on the Plan of Study. The ultimate responsibility for completing degree requirements rests with the student.
 
Students who have active academic, financial or advising holds must clear these holds prior to attempting to enroll. Students can view any holds by logging into the Self Service portal at my.okstate.edu.
 
8.1 Last Day to Enroll. Information regarding dates to enroll, when courses begin, and last days to drop are listed in the Class Schedule available at the Office of the Registrar's website at registrar.okstate.edu.
Generally, the sixth class day of a regular semester or the third class day of the eight-week summer session is the last day a course may be added (nonrestrictive) via the SIS enrollment system. A short course may be added no later than the first day of the short course.
 
8.2 Late Enrollment. Graduate students should enroll prior to the end of the official enrollment deadline for the semester. If they do not, there are limited options to enroll in classes. The options available to the student depend on the number of weeks past the deadline and the student's current enrollment status.
 
During the second week of fall/spring or first week of the eight-week summer session:
•    If a student wishes to add course hours or is not currently enrolled, they must submit a drop/add card or Trial Study signed by their adviser giving permission to enroll.
•    If the student is adding a course they must have the instructor's signature on the add/drop card or Trial Study.
•    If a student is non-degree seeking, they must have the signature of the dean of the Graduate College and the instructor of the course in which they wish to enroll.
 
After the second week of fall/spring or first week of the eight-week summer session graduate students may add any course which has not started.
 
8.3 Other Enrollment. In order to enroll in a given semester, a student must have received grades for at least six semester credit hours (including "I" and "R" and excluding "W") in the 12 months prior to the beginning of that semester.
 
9.0 COURSES OFFERED THROUGH OUTREACH
Courses offered through Outreach are considered equivalent to courses offered through traditional formats. Any student wishing to enroll in a graduate credit course offered through outreach must make application for admission to the Graduate College at OSU.
 
10.0 Correspondence credit
OSU does not offer graduate-level courses by correspondence and does not accept credit taken by correspondence toward an advanced degree. Graduate students may enroll in correspondence courses; however, such courses will not be considered as part of minimum graduate degree or certificate requirements. Tuition waiver programs are not applicable to courses taken through correspondence study. Courses taken through correspondence do not count toward minimum enrollment requirements for any graduate student.
 
11.0 Academic Regulations
Refer also to "University Academic Regulations” section in the Catalog.
 
11.1 Graduate Credit Courses. Courses numbered 5000 and above are for graduate students. Seniors who have obtained prior approval from the Graduate College may enroll in graduate level courses in accordance with the provisions of "Enrollment" stated earlier.
 
Courses numbered 3000 and 4000 that are identified by an asterisk in the "Course Descriptions" of the Catalog can be taken by graduate students and may be used to meet requirements for a graduate degree on the Plan of Study if approved by the student's advisory committee and the dean of the Graduate College. In order to receive graduate credit, students must enroll in the G section of the course. Graduate students enrolled in these courses will be considered as taking the courses for graduate credit (unless they pre-declare the course as taken for undergraduate credit; forms are available in the Graduate College) and will be expected to complete additional assignments at an intellectual level commensurate with graduate level work as proposed by the instructor. Courses that are not identified by an asterisk may not be used to fulfill requirements for a graduate degree.
 
11.2 Grades for Thesis (5000) and Dissertation (6000). The grade of “SR,” indicating satisfactory research progress, or “UR,” indicating unsatisfactory progress, or “IUR,” indicating an incomplete (see section 6.2 “Grade Interpretation” in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of the Catalog) will be assigned to thesis (5000) and dissertation (6000) courses at the end of the semester in which the course is taken. These grades are permanent and have no impact on a student’s grade point average, but affect the graduate student’s academic standing. Only courses in which a grade of “SR” (or a previously-awarded grade of “R,” “A,” “B,” or “C”) is earned may be used toward minimum degree requirements.
 
11.3 Grades for Creative Component Courses. The “R” grade can be assigned in a course identified as a creative component portion of a master’s degree by the graduate program concerned. The grade of “R” may be assigned if more than one semester is required to complete the creative component. Upon completion of the creative component, the adviser submits a Change of Grade form to have the final grade entered.
 
11.4 Pass-No Pass Grading System. Graduate students may take a course utilizing the Pass-No Pass grading system with the consent of their faculty advisers, but courses taken under this system cannot be used on a Plan of Study to meet graduate degree requirements. A student who chooses the pass-no pass option must do so by the last date on which a course may be added. See section 6.6 “Grades and Grading” in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of the Catalog.
 
11.5 Pass-Fail Grading System. Graduate students may take courses utilizing the Pass-Fail grading system with the consent of their faculty advisers; however, only a limited number of these hours can be used on a Plan of Study to meet graduate degree requirements and these require advance permission of the dean of the Graduate College.  Pass-Fail courses are typically internship, practicum, seminar, special problems and student teaching. See section 6.7 “Grades and Grading” in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of the Catalog.
 
11.6 Minimum Grade Requirements. A grade-point average of "B" (3.00) is required to (1) maintain good standing as a graduate student and (2) meet requirements for a degree. No course with a grade of “D” or “F” can be used on the Plan of Study to satisfy the degree course requirements. At the graduate level, a grade of a “D” or “F” is a failing grade that can result in dismissal by the dean of the Graduate College, regardless of academic standing. In determining whether a student has met minimum requirements for a degree, grades for courses on the Plan of Study are averaged separately from courses not on the Plan of Study. In order to continue enrollment in the Graduate College, a graduate student is expected to maintain a minimum graduate GPA of at least 3.00. In order to receive a degree, a student must have a minimum 3.00 GPA in the course work listed on the Plan of Study.
 
No course with a grade below "C" can be used as part of the minimum number of semester credit hours required for the graduate degree.
 
Some programs have more stringent requirements. The graduate program should be consulted concerning minimum grade requirements.
 
11.7  Annual Review of Student Progress.  The graduate program in which a student is seeking a graduate degree will provide a mechanism for assessing the student’s progress towards degree completion at least once annually. If the student is assessed not to be making adequate progress, then a specific plan to address and correct any inadequacies in progress will be prepared in a written document provided to the student and the dean of the Graduate College annually by June 30. Failure to correct these inadequacies may result in termination from the graduate program and/or Graduate College.
 
11.8 Academic Progress. Each semester, the dean of the Graduate College reviews the academic progress of any graduate student who receives a grade of “C” or lower in a class or “UR” in research. Programs are notified which of their students have received a “C” or lower and of the dean of the Graduate College’s academic progress decision. At the discretion of the dean of the Graduate College, one of four actions based on the student’s current semester performance and past academic history will be taken as follows:
 
1. Program Notice. The program is notified and is encouraged to review the student’s performance to determine if any program intervention is needed.
2. Academic Probation. If a student’s overall GPA drops below a 3.00, if a “UR” grade is earned, or if the dean of the Graduate College judges the student’s overall academic performance so warrants then s/he is subject to being placed on academic probation. At the discretion of the dean of the Graduate College, probation may be removed at the end of the semester only after the student brings his or her cumulative GPA for courses eligible for graduate credit taken at OSU to 3.0 or greater, earns a SR grade, and/or completes all degree requirements, whichever comes first.
3. No Further Enrollment Without Program Consent (NFEWPC).
a. If the student was admitted on academic probation and did not meet the requirements of this admission, or
b. If they have received two consecutive grades of “UR”, or 
c. If the student was on academic probation the previous semester, or
d. If the dean of the Graduate College believes the student’s overall academic performance warrants program intervention, then the student is not permitted to enroll further without the consent of the program. To continue in the program, the student must submit a written petition to the dean of the Graduate College requesting reinstatement and outlining a plan to remedy the academic situation. This petition must be accompanied by a letter of support from the department head or graduate program coordinator. Failure to submit such a reinstatement petition could result in the canceling of any pre-enrollment for the upcoming semester.
 
4. No Further Enrollment (NFE). The student has consistently performed below the acceptable standards for graduate students. The student is not permitted to continue graduate study at OSU. 
 
11.9 Course Grade Appeals. A student may appeal a grade given by an instructor in a case in which he or she believes the grade awarded is inconsistent with the announced grading policy. The student should consult the “Student Rights and Responsibilities” or contact the Office of Academic Affairs for information regarding initiating the appeals process.
 
11.10 Appeals of Research Grades and Non-grade Issues. A student wishing to appeal a “UR” grade issued for a research course (5000 or 6000), or an academic issue not involving a grade should contact the dean of the Graduate College about the appeals process available to graduate students (http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/content/appeals-policy). 
 
11.11 Advisory Committee Decisions-Criteria for Passing. In decisions resulting from a vote of a graduate student advisory committee (e.g., PhD candidacy exam, final thesis defense, or approving a dissertation), a pass requires that the thesis/dissertation adviser vote in the affirmative and that no more than one member of the committee dissent. Graduate programs may impose more stringent requirements.
 
11.12 Discontinuance From a Program. In instances when a student reaches a situation when it is no longer possible to complete the intended degree (e.g., failure of all permitted attempts of the PhD qualifying exam, comprehensive exam or candidacy exam), and is still in good academic standing with the Graduate College, a domestic student may be considered for transfer to non-degree seeking student status and be subject to all non-degree seeking student rules (including maximum number of hours that can later be used toward a graduate degree or certificate program). If visa restrictions prohibit the student's matriculation as a non-degree seeking student, the Graduate College will inform the Office of International Students and Scholars of the student's impending dismissal from the program; the student will have until the end of the semester to be admitted into another graduate program. This change in status is initiated with a letter from the unit head or graduate program coordinator to the student, copied to the dean of the Graduate College, and should detail the reasons for the student's potential dismissal from the program. In accordance with graduate program policies, students have a limited number of days from the intent to dismiss letter date to initiate the appeals process in the program.  Graduate students should contact the dean of the Graduate College about the appeals process (http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/content/appeals-policy).
 
11.13 Second Graduate Degrees. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education do not allow students to obtain a second degree in the same “major” as the first degree, even if the options are different. For example, it is not possible to earn both an MS degree in Physics with an option in Medical Physics and an MS degree in Physics with an option in Optics and Photonics. Completion of requirements for more than one option may be noted on the official transcript, but a second degree will not be awarded. Additionally, because of the OSRHE requirement for a coursework common core within a master’s degree options, it should not be assumed that obtaining an additional option within the same degree program and level will be possible. Careful discussions and planning with the Graduate Program Coordinator prior to admission is imperative, if such study is desired.
 
12.0 Responsible Conduct of Research
All graduate students must complete Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training requirements prior to the submission of a Plan of Study. A student should consult with his/her graduate coordinator as to what these requirements are in his/her graduate program. Graduate programs may impose more stringent requirements. A Plan of Study will not be approved by the Graduate College until the graduate program has certified RCR completion. Information and University policies regarding RCR can be found at http://compliance.okstate.edu/rcr/rcr-index.
 
12.1 Research Involving Human Subjects. If the thesis, dissertation, formal report or creative component involves the use of human subjects, the research project is governed by federal regulations that require review by the OSU Institutional Review Board (IRB). Approval to conduct the research must be obtained from the IRB before the research is started.
 
Failure to obtain IRB approval will result in the University’s rejection of the thesis, dissertation, or formal report. While the Graduate College does not monitor the process resulting in a creative component, this does not negate the student's responsibility to obtain IRB approval if human subjects are involved in that creative activity.
 
This section is meant to be informational only and does not contain a complete description of the IRB review process. All of the forms and guidance for completing the application are available on the IRB Internet site compliance.vpr.okstate.edu/IRB/forms.aspx. 
 
13.0 Graduation Clearance Process
At the time of enrollment for the last semester or summer session of work toward a degree, graduate students must complete and submit a Graduation Clearance form to the Graduate College before they can submit an Application for Diploma with the Office of the Registrar. The Graduation Clearance form is completed in conjunction with the academic adviser and confirms that a student has met or will meet by the end of the semester in question, all program and Graduate College requirements to earn the degree s/he is seeking. If these requirements are not met, the student must complete a new Graduation Clearance Form and Application for Diploma for a future semester. In order to allow opportunity for any class schedule changes necessitated by the review of the Graduation Clearance Form, this form and the Application for Diploma, should be submitted as early as possible in the graduating semester but no later than the deadlines listed on the Graduate College website.
 
13.1 Graduate Commencement and Diplomas. The University holds one Graduate Commencement Ceremony at the close of the fall and spring semesters. Students who plan to meet graduation requirements at the close of the summer session are invited and encouraged to participate in the Graduate Commencement Ceremony at the close of the previous spring semester. Although attendance is not compulsory, the University encourages all candidates for advanced degrees to participate in the Graduate Commencement Ceremony. Candidates should also notify the Office of the Registrar of the address to which the diploma should be mailed.
 
13.2 Records and Transcripts. All permanent records are stored in the Office of the Registrar. Requests for grades, transcripts and diplomas should be made to that office. 
A graduate student who does not complete the requirements in time to receive the degree at the end of the semester may secure a statement from the Office of the Registrar when all requirements for the degree have been satisfied. Such a statement will not be issued until all grades for the semester have been recorded.
 
14.0 GRADUATE PROGRAMS OFFERED AT OSU-TULSA, GREENWOOD CAMPUS
OSU offers several graduate degrees and courses in Tulsa. All courses offered by OSU-Tulsa are considered resident credit for degrees granted by OSU. Both current and prospective graduate students are encouraged to utilize the OSU-Tulsa Graduate Student Services Center (GSSC), located in Main Hall 1101. To schedule an appointment with a GSSC representative or to learn more about a graduate program in Tulsa, call 918-594-8445 or email  osutgssc@okstate.edu. The graduate degree, graduate certificate and certification programs that OSU offers in Tulsa can be found at http://www.osu-tulsa.okstate.edu.
 
15.0 GRADUATE PROGRAMS OFFERED AT THE OSU CENTER FOR HEALTH SCIENCES IN TULSA
OSU offers specialized graduate programs in athletic training (MAT), biomedical sciences (MS, PhD, and a dual degree tract DO/PhD) forensic sciences (MSFS). and health care administration (MS) through the OSU Center for Health Sciences (CHS).
 
15.1 Athletic Training. The Master of Athletic Training (MAT) graduate program in the School of Allied Health at OSU Center for Health Sciences prepares individuals to become competent and independent clinicians who will enhance the quality of patient health care and advance the profession of athletic training through practice and research. The MAT program is currently accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).  Once accepted into the program, students are assigned to a Board of Certification (BOC) Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) where they are responsible to provide for the overall health care of patients over the course of their respective seasons or occupation. Clinical instruction of students is achieved through direct supervision of a licensed physician and the athletic trainer.
 
The curriculum is based in the human sciences with anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, pathology, pharmacology, nutrition and psychology providing the theoretical foundation of student inquiry. Students learn how to apply these theoretical concepts while in the clinical setting learning under licensed physicians, athletic trainers, physical therapists and other allied health care professionals. This balance of theory and practical application prepares students to sit for the Board of Certification examination where upon successful completion, may earn the credentials ATC.
 
15.2 Biomedical Sciences. The MS and PhD programs in biomedical sciences are interdisciplinary programs involving the basic biomedical science disciplines of anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology. The programs consist of core basic sciences medical courses, additional basic sciences graduate courses, research, thesis for the MS and a dissertation for the PhD. A non-thesis MS is also available.
 
15.3 Forensic Sciences. The graduate program in forensic sciences is an interdisciplinary master’s program that reflects a broad range of disciplines and offers specialization in both research and non-thesis tracks. All students must satisfactorily complete 39 credit hours to receive the Master of Science in Forensic Sciences.
 
Students working toward a degree requiring a thesis can specialize in one of four areas: forensic identification through DNA, forensic pathology, forensic psychology, or forensic toxicology. Successful presentation and defense of a thesis is required for a master’s degree in these areas.
Non-thesis options include forensic science administration and forensic document examination, with courses in both options offered entirely online. Applicants to the administrative program must have professional experience in a related field, while those entering the document examiner program must be either in training/apprenticeship positions or under the guidance/supervision of a certified document examiner.
 
15.4 Health Care Administration. The graduate program requires students to take core courses in health care administration and research methods along with a series of electives selected from applicable courses in business and social sciences. The multidisciplinary approach to the health care administration discipline provides students with a unique perspective on the complex issues facing the profession today.
 
16.0 . Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs Offered at OSU-Stillwater
OSU has a series of interdisciplinary graduate programs designed to provide students with a breadth of knowledge that is not ordinarily found in traditional programs. Descriptions are given below for the following interdisciplinary programs: Environmental Science (MS, PhD), Food Science (MS, PhD), Interdisciplinary Science (MS), International Studies (MS), Photonics (PhD), Plant Science (PhD), and Public Health (MPH). 
 
16.1 Environmental Science
Scott Stoodley, PhD—Director
Ken Ede, PhD—Associate Director, OSU-Tulsa
Chandler Fann—Program Coordinator
 
The Environmental Science Graduate Program (ESGP) is operated under the administration of the Graduate College at OSU. Due to its interdisciplinary nature, the ESGP attracts and produces students capable of thinking beyond a single discipline. Our unique approach to graduate education offers flexibility with locations in Stillwater and OSU-Tulsa. Our program is one of the oldest programs in the nation having been founded back in 1977. These ESGP graduates have gone on to be leaders in every facet of the environmental field.
 
Our students are housed in one of many departments including Agricultural Economics, Economics, Leisure Studies, Plant & Soil Sciences, Natural Resources Ecology & Management, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Geology, Geography, Political Science, Educational and School Psychology, School of Teaching and Curriculum Leadership, Sociology, and Zoology. There are over 128 faculty affiliated with the ESGP at OSU and over 70 of these have served as faculty advisors.
 
We offer our graduate students either a Master of Science or PhD degree. Each student has a unique opportunity to develop a degree plan that specifically addresses their individual career goals. Degree integrity is ensured through the guidance of the student’s graduate advisor and committee.
 
16.1.1  Programs of Study. The breadth of offerings at OSU affords flexibility to the student interested in specific environmental career tracks. A student can design a unique degree plan to target a particular focus area that meets his or her professional goals or can follow structured plans recommended for specializations in:
 
Environmental Management, Environmental Management-Professional Science Masters (PSM), Environmental Education, Environmental Policy and Conflict Management, Environmental Sustainability, Environmental Chemistry-Toxicology and Risk Assessment, and Water and Watershed Management.
 
The student's graduate advisory committee assists the student in preparing a Plan of Study to assure focus, breadth and quality.
 
16.1.2  Program Assessment Portfolio. The ESGP assesses its curriculum each year to ensure that students are receiving the instruction needed to succeed in environmental careers. To accomplish this assessment, selected environmental faculty members review materials generated by students in the program. Each student must develop and maintain a collection of portfolio materials that demonstrate progress toward the degree. The portfolio must be submitted during the last semester of the student’s enrollment.
 
16.1.3  Master of Science Degree. To obtain an MS degree in environmental science, the student must complete a 36-credit hour course of study. This must include fifteen hours of core curriculum (ENVR 5303, ENVR 5123, three hours in research methods or statistics, three hours in social science and three hours in natural science). Each student must also either complete a six-hour research thesis, a three hour research report, or a creative component. The remaining credit hours can be taken as electives that focus on the student’s area of particular interest.  Students create their original Plans of Study with the assistance of their advisor and committee. It must be completed prior to the end of the second semester (excluding summer sessions) of enrollment.
 
For the MS degree with a specialization in Environmental Management, students must take 21 credit hours of science courses. In addition, they are required to take 5503 Environmental Management Practicum and 5510 Environmental Management Internship and Report. Students with this degree specialization are not required to meet the social science requirements.  
 
16.1.4  Doctor of Philosophy Degree. The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours beyond an MS degree. This includes a minimum of 36 to 45 hours of course work consisting of six hours of a skill component, ENVR 5303, ENVR 5123, and ENVR 6011. Course hours should reflect the biological, social, and physical aspects of the concentration area. Research and courses should reflect the student’s professional goals. A dissertation (ENVR 6000) is required and consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours. At least 75 percent of the courses for the PhD degree must be at the 5000 level or above, including dissertation research hours. The student must successfully pass a written and oral qualifying exam after course work is completed. Students create their original Plans of Study with the assistance of their advisor and committee. It must be completed prior to the end of the third semester (excluding summer sessions) of enrollment.
 
16.1.5  Admission. Each student seeking admission to the Environmental Science Graduate Program must submit the following materials: (1) An official Graduate College application for admission and a nonrefundable fee, (2) Official transcripts for all college level courses, (3) A statement of career goals, including competencies to be gained during program enrollment, (4) Three letters of recommendation discussing the student’s potential for graduate work, and (5) GRE test scores (use institution code 6546 and department code 0502). International students must also earn a TOEFL score of at least 90iBT/577PBT and submit a financial affidavit for the amount required by OSU. To be admitted, applicants must have earned a college grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale. Students are required to have completed college-level courses that address the fundamentals and principles of chemistry, biology, ecology, and algebra prior to admission.
 
All applications to the ESGP should be submitted at least 60 days before the opening of the semester in which they wish to enroll. International students should supply all application materials by March 1st for summer enrollment, June 1st for fall enrollment, and October 15th for spring enrollment.
 
It is recommended that students identify an advisor prior to admission to the program. The ESGP Program Coordinator will assist the student with this process. If the student is unable to identify a permanent advisor, then a temporary advisor may be appointed. However, the student must identify a permanent advisor prior to completion of the ninth credit hour in order to be able to enroll in the following semester.
 
16.1.6  Financial Assistance. Graduate research assistantships and other funding opportunities are often available through affiliated environmental science faculty members. The initial application should specify the student’s interest in an assistantship.
Additional information about the environmental science graduate program can be found at esgp.okstate.edu.
 
16.2 Food Science
William McGlynn, PhD—Program Coordinator
The following departments participate in the food science program: Agricultural Economics, Animal Science, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Horticulture, Plant and Soil Science, and Nutritional Sciences.
 
Food science is an interdisciplinary graduate program designed to provide an opportunity for students to acquire basic knowledge of the food industry encompassing the biological and physical sciences. The increasing complexity of the problems involved in the production, processing, and utilization of food demands increased fundamental knowledge to solve these problems. There is a great demand for personnel with advanced training in the broad area of food science to staff research and quality assurance facilities of industry, universities and the federal government.
 
16.2.1  Program Assessment Portfolio. Admission to either the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree program requires an undergraduate major in animal science, biochemistry, dairy science, food science, human nutrition, microbiology or poultry science. Students majoring in other curricula may qualify by remedying specific undergraduate deficiencies recognized by the student's graduate committee. A student enrolling in a degree program must have been accepted by an adviser prior to official admission.
 
The GRE is required for admission. Three letters of reference are also required.
 
16.3 International Studies
Joel Jenswold, PhD—Director of Academic Programs
Janet Herren—Graduate Coordinator
Leaders in today's global community require a broad international understanding as well as specific knowledge within a discipline. For this reason, the School of International Studies (SIS) offers multi-disciplinary graduate programs: the Master of Science in International Studies, the Master's International Program (MIP), and the graduate certificates in Global Issues and International Disaster and Emergency Management (IDEM).  The MIP combines the MS in International Studies with service in the Peace Corps.  For more information contact i-study@okstate.edu.
The SIS graduate programs enroll approximately 80 students from the U.S. and 20 different countries.  This dynamic group is equally divided between men and women and between U.S. and international students.  Graduates become part of a global network of friends and colleagues positioned to meet tomorrow’s challenges.
 
16.3.1 Master of Science in International Studies. Students complete 33 credit hours, including four core courses, four - five courses in a designated focus area, and two - three elective courses. Students are encouraged to participate in an international internship or other international experience. MS students complete their degree with either a thesis or a creative component. 
 
16.3.2 Master’s International Program (MIP). This program provides the opportunity to incorporate Peace Corps service into the MS in International Studies degree plan. Candidates may receive up to nine credit hours in the SIS master's program in connection with their Peace Corps service.
 
16.3.3 Certificate in Global Issues. Taken on its own or in conjunction with another graduate program, students can receive a graduate certificate by taking 15 credit hours in International Studies. Three of the four core courses and two additional courses are selected from a focus area. 
The more than 150 faculty members affiliated with the School of International Studies (SIS) come from every academic college at OSU. Students select courses from a rich variety of subjects taught by nationally and internationally recognized scholars. Besides the interdisciplinary core courses, students concentrate in one of five focus areas:
 
16.3.4 Certificate in International Disaster and Emergency Management (IDEM).  Taken on its own or in conjunction with another graduate program, students can receive a graduate certificate by taking 18 credit hours in International Studies and Fire and Emergency Management Administration.
 
The International Studies core includes an international experience in either governmental or non-governmental organizations active in international disaster and emergency management. A study abroad component will be strongly encouraged for those students who do not have significant international experience. In addition, students will be required to complete an individual study with an expert in the field. 
 
The Fire and Emergency Management Administration core consists of two courses that, together, can be taken as the fundamentals of International Disaster and Emergency Management, consisting of POLS 5693, which serves as the introduction to International Emergency Management and will introduce students to the basic concepts of emergency management administration, and POLS 6203, which is focused more directly on the practical aspects of emergency management in an international setting. 
 
The electives have been structured to allow students to meet their individual needs and professional interests, thus allowing for some specialization within the structure of the certificate program.
 
16.4 Interdisciplinary Science
Jean Van Delinder, PhD—General Program Coordinator
 
The Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Sciences is for students who wish to increase their competence in a particular thematic area by taking a series of courses in several disciplines. This multidisciplinary approach provides educational opportunities leading to a variety of careers. Interdisciplinary sciences consist of no fewer than three separate fields of study with at least six hours in each field. No more than 15 hours may be taken in any one area. The advisory committee will assist the student in formulating the Plan of Study.
 
16.4.1  Admission Requirements. An undergraduate grade-point average of 3.00 is required for unqualified admission. Students with a grade-point average between 2.50 and 3.00 may be admitted on a probationary basis.
 
Applications to the program should include: (1) a cover letter indicating the personal goals and professional objectives to be obtained from the program; (2) transcripts from all schools previously attended; (3) three letters of recommendation from persons who can describe abilities, interest, and motivation as a student; (4)  a proposed course of study with an endorsement from an OSU faculty adviser.
 
Particular courses are not specified for the degree; the advisory committee can assist in selecting appropriate courses. The course of study must include at least 21 credit hours at the graduate level (5000 or above). Up to nine graduate hours can be transferred from a regionally-accredited graduate program with consent of the advisory committee. The student chooses any of the three master's degree plans:  (1)  a 30-hour plan, including a six-hour research thesis; (2) a 34-hour plan, including a two-credit hour formal report; or (3)  a 36-hour plan with a well-defined, creative and scholarly component.
 
16.5  Photonics
Al Rosenberger, PhD/Rama Ramakumar, PhD—Program Coordinators
OSU offers a multidisciplinary program leading to the PhD degree in photonics. The program draws on the faculties of the departments of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering. A student typically chooses either of these as his or her "home department" on the basis of academic background and research interests. A multidisciplinary program of course work is tailored to the goals of each individual student mentored by a chosen faculty member from the home department and guided by the advisory committee. The PhD program provides a biophotonics specialization with faculty from the departments of Chemistry or Microbiology and Molecular Chemistry, or the College of Veterinary Medicine serving as research advisers. For information regarding the Photonics option in either the MS in Physics or MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, see the relevant departmental section of the Catalog.
 
16.5.1  Doctoral Program Requirements. A total of 90 credit hours beyond the BS (60 beyond the MS) degree are required for the PhD in photonics. All students must form a preliminary advisory committee to guide them initially in the photonics PhD program. Eventually a student chooses a permanent research adviser who chairs the graduate research committee. Course work is taken from the basic and advanced courses offered by the Departments of Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering. Courses from other departments may also be recommended by the graduate research committee. In addition, students are required to take two or more photonics tutorials, offered by faculty in their research lab, emphasizing particular research problems and techniques. A preliminary exam is administered usually during the student's second year in the PhD program. Admission to PhD candidacy follows the successful completion of the qualifying exam. The focus of the PhD program is the completion of a faculty directed research project and the defense of the resulting dissertation. A detailed Plan of Study specific to the research specialization chosen is formulated by the student in consultation with the advisory committee.
 
16.5.2  Research Opportunities. The faculty emphasizes both basic and applied interdisciplinary research. To accomplish this, in addition to a myriad of state-of-the-art laser systems and computational facilities, the OSU campus houses two molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth and analysis facilities and unique optoelectronics THz beam systems. Current research programs include quantum optics, quantum cryptology, "whispering gallery modes," experimental and calculational programs in nanostructured materials, optical fiber communications and optical circuits for computing as well as high speed optoelectronics applications to fundamental and applied problems in the THz frequency range. Other investigations center on the preparation and characterization of specialty-doped insulators and semiconductors for use as lasing materials, non-linear optical crystals for data storage and holographic applications, and photonic-based chemical, physical and biochemical environmental sensors. Research programs in the biomedical applications of lasers at both the basic research and clinical application levels seek to understand the interaction of light with biological materials at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels.
 
16.5.3 Admission Requirements. Students with a BS degree in physics, electrical engineering, chemistry (or related fields) are welcome to apply to the PhD photonics program. No additional tests (such as the GRE) are required, but such scores may be submitted in support of an application. A TOEFL score of at least 600 is required of international students.
 
Applications should include: (1)  a cover letter indicating the program of specialization and whether the student wishes to be considered by that program for a fellowship or teaching assistantship; (2)  a personal statement of interests and goals, noting especially how they relate to the degree in photonics; (3)     transcripts of all previous academic work (an unofficial transcript will suffice for the application; official transcripts are required by the Graduate College after admission.); and (4)  the names and email addresses of three persons who have been requested to submit letters of reference. 
 
16.5.4 Financial Aid.  Most students entering the photonics programs are offered a graduate teaching assistantship in their home department. A student pursuing an original research project may receive support as a graduate research assistant (RA) through grants and contracts to the individual faculty member who serves as the adviser. 
 
16.6  Plant Science
William Henley, PhD—Program Coordinator
Solutions to current problems in plant science often require integration of knowledge from a number of disciplines. The Plant Science program at OSU provides the opportunity for the exceptional PhD student to develop an academic and research program tailored to his or her individual interests and needs. Faculty participating in this program comes from the departments of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Botany, Entomology and Plant Pathology, Forestry, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, and Plant and Soil Science. The multidisciplinary nature of this program allows students to experience many facets of plant science and affords them the flexibility to seek employment in a variety of settings in the plant sciences. Students, in consultation with their graduate committees, develop a program in one of three specialization areas (cellular and molecular, organismal or ecological), but are expected to develop a sound foundation across all disciplines of plant study.
 
16.6.1  Admission Requirements. Application for admission includes a statement defining plant science interests, a resume, three letters of reference, an abstract of the Master of Science thesis (if applicable), GRE scores (the Advanced Biology GRE is also desirable), and a minimum TOEFL of 88iBT/570PBT. A student must be accepted by a faculty adviser prior to official admission.
 
16.6.2  Financial Assistance. Students seeking financial assistance should inquire directly to the department(s) and faculty of interest within the plant science program.
 
16.7 Public Health
Julie Croff, PhD, MPH—Program Director
 
The Oklahoma State University Master of Public Health (MPH) program focuses on training public health professionals to improve health and wellbeing of rural and underserved populations.  Students are encouraged to identify a rural community or undeserved population as the focus of class projects. In doing so, students will have the opportunity to assess the needs of that community or population, and to thoughtfully create programs for preventing disease within that community or population. Prevention efforts often include a focus on lifestyle and health behaviors. Current students study health behaviors and health outcome areas that include: the use of alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, mental health, disabilities, zoonotic diseases, nutrition and food security, obesity, physical activity, maternal and child health, teen pregnancy and sexual health. These students are meaningfully engaged with rural communities throughout Oklahoma and underserved populations that include indigenous populations, racial minorities, recent immigrants, and sexual minorities.
 
16.7.1 Admission Requirements.  Application for admission includes a statement of purpose defining professional goals and interest in public health, a resume, three letters of reference, GRE, MAT, GMAT or MCAT scores.
 
17.0 Graduate Certificate Programs offering
Graduate certificate programs offer students the opportunity for focused study of a body of knowledge at the graduate level, leading to the award of an academic transcripted academic credential that can be earned in a relatively short time. Graduate certificate programs can serve both as a stepping stone onto more advanced study leading to a master’s or doctoral degree or as a stand alone educational achievement to assist an individual in their career. Many OSU graduate certificate programs are offered online or on the graduate-serving campuses (OSU-Stillwater, OSU-Tulsa and Center for Health Sciences-Tulsa). In addition, many graduate certificate programs allow students to enroll as either a certificate-seeking or a degree-seeking graduate student. Certificate-seeking students are not eligible for GTA or GRA positions or associated benefits, but may be eligible for federal financial aid. Below are the current graduate certificate offerings at OSU – please see the Graduate College website for additional information (http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/content/graduate-certificates). 
 
Aerospace Security
Big Data Analytics
Bioenergy and Sustainable Technology
Bioinformatics
Business Data Mining
Business Sustainability
College Teaching
Engineering & Technology Management
Entrepreneurship
Family Financial Planning
Gerontology
Global Issues
Grassland Management
Information Assurance
Interdisciplinary Toxicology
International Disaster and Emergency Management
Marketing Analytics
Non-Profit Management
Online Teaching
Public Health
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
 
17.1 Admission to a Graduate Certificate Program. Any student admitted to the Graduate College may apply for admission to a graduate certificate program. Some certificate programs may have additional requirements, such as official scores on a standardized test, letters of recommendation, etc. Contact the appropriate graduate program for specifics.
 
17.2 Basic Requirements.  A graduate certificate requires completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work eligible for graduate credit, of which at least two-thirds must be at the 5000 level or above. Specific certificate programs may have more stringent requirements.
 
17.3 Transfer of Courses. With the approval of the graduate program and the Graduate College, up to three hours of graduate-level credit from another institution may be used toward certificate requirements. The GPA must be at least 3.0 on any transfer credit.
 
17.4 Academic Standing.  A grade-point average of "B" (3.0) is required on courses applicable to a graduate certificate. No grade lower than a "C" may be used as part of the minimum requirements for the certificate. Individual certificate programs may have more stringent requirements.
 
17.5 Plan of Study and Certificate Completion Procedures. Upon application to a graduate certificate program, a student should complete a plan of study listing the courses intended to be used in earning the certificate. This plan must be approved by the graduate program and the Graduate College prior to recording the credential on the student's academic record. During the semester of anticipated certificate completion, the student must complete an Application for Certificate Completion, which is submitted to the Office of the Registrar. This action will cause the graduate certificate to be recorded on the official transcript and a certificate will be printed, provided all requirements have been met.
 
17.6 Special Program - Certificate Program in Education. OSU offers Oklahoma State Department of Education-approved post-bachelor’s certification programs for elementary school principals, school counselors, reading specialists, library/media specialists, and secondary school principals. Certification is also offered in speech and language pathology and in special education.
 
Master’s degrees are available in most of these programs and doctorates are available in many.
 
Post-master’s level certification programs are available for school superintendents and school psychologists.  
 
Inquiries concerning any aspect of the Professional Education program should be addressed to the Office of Professional Education at 405.744.6252 or the head of the unit/department/school offering the program.
 
18.0 Graduate Minors
Graduate minors offer students the opportunity to pursue coursework outside, or ancillary to, the requirements for the degree earned. Minors may not be earned independently of a degree granted by OSU. OSU offers graduate minors in the following areas:
Agribusiness
Agricultural Economics
Entomology
Plant Pathology
Statistics
 
18.1 Basic Requirements. A graduate minor must include between nine and eighteen hours, inclusive, of coursework eligible for graduate credit.  At least two-thirds of the applicable coursework must be at the 5000-level or above.
 
Transfer of courses: No more than one-third of the credit for the minor may be earned through transfer credit of courses taken at other institutions, with the approval of the coordinator of the minor and the dean of the Graduate College.  Transfer credit will only be considered if it was earned when the student was post-baccalaureate (i.e., after earning a bachelor’s degree) at another accredited institution. All courses used as transfer credit must have a grade of “B” or better.  Grades earned in courses transferred to Oklahoma State University will not be used in calculating the cumulative GPA. 
 
18.2 Academic Standing. A grade-point average of “B” (3.0) is required on courses applicable to a graduate minor. No grade lower than a “C” may be used as part of the minimum requirements for the minor. Individual minors may have more stringent requirements.
 
18.3 Plan of Study and Minor Completion Procedures. Graduate students can declare a minor by entering it in the appropriate section of an original or revised Plan of Study submitted to the Graduate College prior to conferral of the degree. The pursuit of graduate minors is not denoted on the academic transcript while in progress. Graduate students can file for minor completion in the semester that the required courses for that minor will be finished. At that time, the graduate student should ask the coordinator for that minor area to submit a memorandum to the Graduate College certifying the completion of the minor requirements and listing the courses required for the minor. A notation of the minor will be added to the student’s transcript after the conferral of a degree. The courses required for a graduate minor may be included on a Plan of Study for any graduate degree or they may be in addition to the degree requirements, depending on the overlap between the minor and the degree Plan of Study. However, the graduate minor must be earned in an academic field other than the student’s graduate program or degree option (for example, a graduate student who is majoring in economics could not receive a graduate minor in economics). 
 
18.4 Time Limits. Requirements for the graduate minor must be completed at the time of conferral of the primary degree.  All graduate courses used to complete the minor must have been taken within ten years prior to the date of completion of the graduate minor requirements.  
 
19.0 Master’s Degree Programs.
 
19.1 Abbreviations.
MA - Master of Arts
MAG - Master of Agriculture
MAT - Master of Athletic Training
MBA - Master of Business Administration
MFA - Master of Fine Arts
MM - Master of Music
MPH - Master of Public Health
MS  - Master of Science
 
19.2 Current Degree Inventory.
Accounting, MS
Agricultural Communications, MS
Agricultural Economics, MS
Agricultural Education, MS
Animal Science, MS
Applied Statistics, MS
Art History, MA
Athletic Training, MAT 
Aviation and Space, MS
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, MS
Biomedical Sciences, MS
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, MS
Botany, MS
Business Administration, MBA
Business Analytics, MS
Chemical Engineering, MS
Chemistry, MS
Civil Engineering, MS
Communication Sciences and Disorders, MS
Computer Science, MS
Counseling, MS (Mental Health Counseling; School Counseling)
Creative Writing, MFA
Design, Housing and Merchandising, MS (Apparel Design and Production, 
Interior Design, Merchandising; Retail Merchandising Leadership)
Economics, MS
Educational Leadership Studies, MS (College Student Development; 
Higher Education; School Administration)
Educational Psychology, MS (Educational Psychology; Educational Research and Evaluation; School Psychometrics)
Educational Technology, MS (Educational Technology; School Library Media)
Electrical Engineering, MS (Control Systems; Optics and Photonics)
Engineering and Technology Management, MS
English, MA
Entomology and Plant Pathology, MS (Entomology; Plant Pathology)
Entrepreneurship, MS
Environmental Engineering, MS
Environmental Science, MS (Environmental Management Professional Science Master’s)
Family Financial Planning, MS
Fire and Emergency Management Administration, MS
Food Science, MS
Forensic Sciences, MS (Arson and Explosives Investigation; Forensic Document Examination; Forensic Science Administration)
General Agriculture, MAg (Agribusiness; Agricultural Economics; 
Agricultural Education; Agricultural Leadership; Animal Science; Entomology; Horticulture; Natural Resource Ecology and Management; Plant Pathology; Plant Science; Soil Science)
Geography, MS
Geology, MS
Graphic Design, MFA
Health and Human Performance, MS (Applied Exercise Science; 
Athletic Training; Health Promotions; Physical Education)
Health Care Administration, MS (Administration; Leadership and Entrepreneurship)
History, MA
Horticulture, MS
Hospitality Administration, MS
Human Development and Family Science, MS (Child and Family Services; Developmental and Family Sciences; Early Childhood Education; Family and Community Science; Gerontology; Marriage and Family Therapy)
Industrial Engineering and Management, MS
Information Assurance, MS
Integrative Biology, MS
Interdisciplinary Science, MS 
International Agriculture, MAG, MS
International Studies, MS
Leisure Studies, MS
Management Information Systems, MS
Mass Communications, MS
Materials Science and Engineering, MS
Mathematics, MS
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, MS (Unmanned Aerial Systems)
Microbiology, Cell and Molecular Biology, MS
Music, MM (Applied Music; Conducting)
Natural Resource Ecology and Management, MS (Fisheries and Aquatic Ecology; Forest Resources; Rangeland Ecology and Management; 
Wildlife Ecology and Management)
Nutritional Sciences, MS (Dietetics; Nutrition)
Petroleum Engineering, MS
Philosophy, MA
Physics, MS (Medical Physics, Optics and Photonics)
Plant and Soil Sciences, MS
Political Science, MA
Psychology, MS
Public Health, MPH (Rural and Underserved Populations)
Quantitative Financial Economics, MS
Sociology, MS
Statistics, MS
Teaching, MA
Teaching, Learning and Leadership, MS (Curriculum and Leadership Studies; Elementary/Middle/Secondary Education/K-12 Education; Mathematics/Science Education; Reading and Literacy; Secondary Education for Teachers Non-traditionally Certified; Special Education; Workforce and Adult Education)
Theatre, MA
Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, MS
 
19.3 Basic Requirements.   The master's degree may be earned by one of three plans as follows:
 
Plan I—with thesis, 30 credit hours, consisting of 24 hours of course work and six hours of research with a grade of "SR;"
Plan II—with report, 32 credit hours, consisting of 30 hours of course work and two hours of research with a grade of "SR;"
Plan III—with no thesis or report, 32 credit hours of course work, including the creative component. The creative component may be a special report, an annotated bibliography, a project in research or design, or other creative activity, as designated by the advisory committee. Courses numbered 5000 or 6000 may not be used on a Plan of Study involving a creative component.
 
The numbers of credits specified for each plan are minimums set by the Graduate College. Graduate program requirements may exceed these minimums. 
 
The graduate program, with the approval of the dean of the Graduate College, decides which alternatives are open to the students. Some graduate programs may require a minimum number of credit hours of upper-division and graduate courses in the major field, including courses taken as an undergraduate. 
 
A student who holds a DVM, MD, DO, DDS, LLB, JD, or equivalent professional degree may receive up to nine hours credit toward a master's degree, subject to the recommendation of the advisory committee and the approval of the dean of the Graduate College. However, a student receiving this credit may not transfer additional hours to OSU from other graduate programs.
 
19.4 Residence Requirements.  Candidates for a master's degree must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours from OSU if they follow Plan I, or 23 semester credit hours if they follow Plan II or III. Nine semester credit hours of the 30 or 32 required for the degree may be completed by graduate courses taken at another accredited college or university.
19.5  Advisory Committee. Upon recommendation of the graduate program and approval of the dean of the Graduate College, an advisory committee of no fewer than three voting members will be appointed. The advisory committee must include a minimum of three members of the Graduate Faculty. The chair of the committee need not necessarily serve as the student's research adviser, but must hold an OSU faculty appointment and have familiarity with the academic requirements of the degree sought. To view the roles and responsibilities associated with members of advisory committees, go to https://gradcollege.okstate.edu/best-practices.
 
19.6 Level of Courses Applied to Graduate Degree. Graduate students must complete no fewer than 21 semester credit hours of 5000- and 6000-level courses through OSU as presented on the Plan of Study to meet requirements for the master's degree.
 
19.7 Plan of Study. The Plan of Study for the degree must be submitted online to the Graduate College prior to completion of the second semester of enrollment for a master's program. The student should develop the Plan of Study with the advisor using the online Plan of Study application (http://planofstudy.okstate.edu.) The online submission request requires approval by the advisory committee and the student’s graduate program with final approval by the Graduate College.  The Plan of Study is subject to modification. All changes must have the approval of the adviser and the student’s graduate program, and a final Plan of Study incorporating all changes should be submitted to the Graduate College by the posted deadline.
 
Graduate credit, up to a maximum of nine hours, used to obtain one master's degree may, with the approval of the advisory committee, be counted toward completion of another master's degree.
 
19.8 Major Subject or Field. A major field of study may cross graduate program lines with approval of the graduate program and dean of the Graduate College.
To receive a master's degree, the student must have completed in the major field of study a minimum of 16 semester credit hours above the prerequisites required for graduate work in that subject or field. 
 
19.9 Language Requirements. A candidate for a master's degree may be required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. Any such requirement of the graduate program included on the Plan of Study and is noted at the time the preliminary plan is approved by the student's adviser. 
 
A foreign language requirement for a master's degree may be met either by examination or by college credit, according to individual graduate program requirement.
 
19.10 Written Examinations. Some graduate programs require a written examination covering the major and minor fields. It is usually taken before the thesis or report has been completed. Arrangements for taking the examination should be made with the graduate program at least three weeks in advance. The written examination must be passed before a final examination is scheduled, if a thesis or report option is used.
 
A student who fails all or part of the written examination should consult the chair of the examination committee to find out what must be done before taking another examination. 
 
19.11 Thesis. Any student working on a thesis should obtain a copy of the Graduate College Thesis/Dissertation Handbook available from the Graduate College at http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/tdg. A thesis must conform to the format specifications set forth in this document. The style of the document is to be determined by the advisory committee and should be reflective of publications in the student's discipline. Any graduate student is writing a thesis must attend a format workshop prior to submission of their final copy.  The dates for the workshops are on the Graduate Calendar and a webinar version is available.
 
It is strongly recommended that a graduate student submit complete copies of his or her thesis to the committee members at least two weeks prior to the defense date, that the defense presentation be publicized, and that the thesis defense occur on a date during the normal academic semesters and sessions. Graduate programs may have additional or more restrictive requirements for thesis defenses.  
 
The student should submit an electronic copy of the final thesis through the OSU electronic submission website. Directions for the website submission are given to the student when he or she submits the Oral Defense Results Form to the Graduate College. In addition, the student must submit to the Graduate College one paper copy of the approval page with all original signatures and the student's name and eight digit CWID number entered at the top of the page. Both the electronic submission and paper approval page must be received no later than the stated final submission deadline date (see the “Calendar” at the front of the “Graduate College” chapter of the Catalog for dates).
 
19.12 Report. The student must submit to the Graduate College the Formal Report Approval form.
 
19.13 Final Examination. If the thesis or report option is used, the student should arrange with the graduate program for the final examination and to distribute a copy as described in the preceding section. The final examination may be oral or written or both. 
The final examination is primarily a defense of the thesis or report. If the defense is judged inadequate, a decision on whether to permit re-examination will be made by the advisory committee. Another examination cannot be given for at least two months after a failure, and a graduate program may limit the number of times that the examination may be repeated. 
 
The committee will notify the Graduate College immediately of results of the final examination. Following satisfactory completion of the final examination, the candidate will make changes in the thesis or report as required by the committee and by the Graduate College, and submit it in final form signed by the committee to the Graduate College by the semester deadline.
 
Please see the Graduate College’s Best Practices: Advisory Committees and Defenses document for additional guidance (https://gradcollege.okstate.edu/best-practices). 
 
20.0 Specialist in Education (EdS) Degree Program
 
The Specialist in Education degree in School Psychology is conferred as an appropriate recognition of achievement as evidenced by the following:
1.    Successful professional performance in the area of the student's specialization. 
2.    Satisfactory completion of a program of graduate study of approximately two academic years.
3.    Satisfactory performance on examinations designed to reveal the student's understanding of the field of specialization and its relation to other areas.
4.    Preparation of a thesis dealing with some aspect of concern to the student's profession and its defense before a committee of the Graduate Faculty. 
 
20.1 Temporary Adviser. At the beginning of a student's Specialist in Education program, the school head will designate a member of the Graduate Faculty to serve as temporary adviser to the student. The temporary adviser will guide the student in the selection of courses for the first semester.
 
20.2 Advisory Committee. Upon recommendation of the school head or the graduate committee of the school, an advisory committee of no fewer than three voting members will be appointed by the dean of the Graduate College. At least one member of the advisory committee must be from a school or department outside the student's major field of study. This committee (1) conducts the preliminary examination and conference, (2) approves the proposed Plan of Study, (3) supervises the student's progress in the program, (4) supervises the research, and (5) arranges for and conducts the final examination. The chair of the committee need not necessarily serve as the student's research adviser, but must hold an OSU faculty appointment and have familiarity with the academic requirements of the degree sought. To view the roles and responsibilities associated with members of advisory committees, go to http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/faculty-and-staff-resources.
 
20.3 Plan of Study. The original Plan of Study for the degree must be submitted to the Graduate College prior to the end of the second semester (excluding summer sessions) of enrollment for a specialist in education program.  The student should develop the Plan of Study with the advisor using the online Plan of Study application (planofstudy.okstate.edu).  The online submission requires approval by the advisory committee and the student’s graduate program with final approval by the Graduate College.
 
The Plan of Study may be modified with the approval of the adviser. A final Plan of Study incorporating all changes should be filed in the Graduate College by the eighth week of the semester in which the degree is to be conferred.
 
20.4 Credit hour Requirements. A minimum of 60 credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree or 33 credit hours beyond the master's degree are required for the Specialist in Education degree. This may include as many as 10 credit hours for the practicum study and accompanying report.
 
20.5 Character of Work. The satisfactory completion of course work (see "General Regulations") is only one requirement for receiving the degree. The student must also: (1) pass a qualifying examination, (2) conduct an appropriate study of education, (3) show qualities of professional leadership and (4) pass a final examination.
 
20.6 Residence Requirements. While the Graduate College does not have a specific residence requirement that applies to all graduate programs, programs  may require a period of time in residence for students enrolled in departmental graduate programs. Programs must inform students of any residence requirements upon their admission to departmental graduate programs. No more than nine hours may be transferred from another university.
 
20.7 Qualifying Examination. A qualifying examination is required of all candidates for the Specialist in Education degree. The nature of this exam is determined within each specialization.
 
20.8 Credit Toward an EdD or a PhD. A student holding an EdS may have the credit hour requirements for a PhD or EdD reduced to 30 hours subject to recommendation by the advisory committee and approval of the dean of the Graduate College. However, all of the remaining 30 hours toward the doctoral degree must be taken at the 5000 or 6000 level and all must be taken at OSU.
 
21.0 Doctor of Education (EdD) Degree Programs
 
The degree of Doctor of Education is a professional degree conferred in recognition of outstanding ability as an educator in some special field or fields as shown by: (1) satisfactory completion of a program of study; (2) passing examinations showing an understanding of the field of specialization and its relation to allied subjects; (3) the preparation of a dissertation demonstrating ability to approach problems with a high degree  of originality and independence; and (4) passing an examination covering the dissertation and related fields. The following EdD degrees are offered:
Applied Educational Studies (Aviation and Space Education; 
College Interdisciplinary) 
Higher Education
School Administration 
 
21.1 Basic Requirements. The Doctor of Education degree requires a minimum of 90 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor's degree, or a minimum of 60 semester credit hours beyond the master's degree in a related discipline. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level should make up at least 75 percent of the Plan of Study and must include ten hours, with a grade of "SR," for the doctoral dissertation. Students may use 90 hours beyond the bachelor's degree as a degree total only if admitted directly into the doctoral program from the bachelor's degree.
A student who holds a DVM, MD, DO, DDS, LLB, JD, or equivalent professional degree may also have the minimum credit hour requirement reduced to 60 hours, subject to the recommendation of their advisory committee and the approval of the dean of the Graduate College. A student may receive only one 30-hour credit reduction in the EdD requirement regardless of the number of master's or professional degrees that he or she holds.
 
21.2 Temporary Adviser. At the beginning of a student's doctoral program, the school head will designate a member of the Graduate Faculty to serve as temporary adviser to the student. The temporary adviser will guide the student in the selection of courses for the first semester. 
 
21.3 Advisory Committee. Upon recommendation of the head of the graduate program and approval of the graduate dean, an advisory committee of no fewer than four voting members will be appointed. The duties of the advisory committee consist of (1) advising the student, (2) assisting the student in preparing a Plan of Study, (3) assisting in planning and conducting the research, (4) supervising the writing of the dissertation, and (5) conducting the dissertation defense. 
 
The chair of the committee need not necessarily serve as the student's research adviser, but must hold an OSU faculty appointment, be a member of the Graduate Faculty with doctoral chairing privileges, and have familiarity with the academic requirements of the degree sought.  Each doctoral committee must have at least one member of the Graduate Faculty from outside the student's major department. To view the roles and responsibilities associated with members of advisory committees, go to http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/best-practices.
The student should consult the members of the advisory committee frequently and keep them informed on the progress of his or her work.
 
21.4  Preliminary Conference. As soon as the student is notified that an advisory committee has been appointed, the student should arrange with the chair for a conference with the committee. During the conference, the preparation and qualifications of the student for graduate work will be discussed and appropriate plans made for future study.
 
21.5 Plan of Study. The student should develop the Plan of Study with the advisor and committee using the online Plan of Study application (http://planofstudy.okstate.edu/).  The online submission requires approval by the advisory committee and the student’s graduate program with final approval by the Graduate College. 
 
Because the acceptance of work that the student desires to use toward the degree rests with the advisory committee, it is important to plan a complete program and have it approved by the dean of the Graduate College as soon as possible. 
 
The original Plan of Study must be submitted to the Graduate College prior to the end of the third semester (excluding summer sessions) of enrollment in the doctoral program.
 
The Plan must include all the acceptable graduate work that has been completed and all that will be taken for the degree. The plan should include (1) at least 75 percent of courses taken at the 5000-6000 level, (2) a minimum of 60 hours beyond the master's degree or 30 hours beyond the EdS and (3) at least 10 hours of dissertation credit. Courses from a master's degree or EdS are not listed on the doctoral Plan of Study.
 
Credit for all courses on a graduate Plan of Study must have been awarded within 10 years of completion of all degree requirements.
 
Changes in the Plan of Study can be made with the approval of the advisory committee and the dean of the Graduate College. A final, accurate and approved plan must be filed by eighth week of the semester in which the degree is to be conferred. 
 
21.6 Character of Work. The satisfactory completion of course work (see "General Regulations") is only one requirement for receiving the degree. The student must also: (1) pass a qualifying examination, (2) prepare an acceptable dissertation, (3) demonstrate the ability to do independent study, (4) pass a defense of dissertation and (5) comply with any other requirements of the major department.
 
21.7 Residence Requirements. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be taken at OSU. While the Graduate College does not have a specific residence requirement that applies to all graduate programs, departments may require a period of time in residence for students enrolled in departmental graduate programs. Programs must inform students of any residence requirements upon their admission to graduate programs. 
 
21.8 Language and Research Instruments Proficiency. All candidates will be expected to have a command of those instruments necessary in the study of educational problems. The doctoral advisory committee of each candidate may require evidence of proficiency in one or more foreign languages, educational research, statistics and computer usage. 
 
21.9 Admission to Doctoral Candidacy. Admission to doctoral candidacy marks the transition into the research phase of a doctoral degree and indicates agreement that the student has demonstrated the ability to do acceptable graduate work and that satisfactory progress has been made toward a degree. Consideration for candidacy requires the presentation of a written research proposal for doctoral research to the doctoral advisory committee, who will assess the proposal and offer the student pertinent counsel, advice and feedback. The approval of the research proposal by the advisory committee is the basic requirement for admission to doctoral candidacy; individual programs will normally impose additional requirements, such as the successful completion of oral and/or written comprehensive or qualifying examinations. These additional requirements may occur in conjunction with the presentation of the research proposal, or they may occur at different times within the course of doctoral study. Admission to doctoral candidacy is conferred with the approval of the dean of the Graduate College, on behalf of the Graduate Council, acting upon the recommendation of program faculty. It is the responsibility of the chair of the advisory committee to notify the Graduate College when admission to candidacy is granted by submitting the Admission to Doctoral Candidacy form. 
 
21.10 Dissertation Hours Taken as a Doctoral Candidate. Admission to candidacy must occur at least six months prior to the date of the final dissertation defense. Since admission to candidacy may occur at various times related to the academic calendar, the student will need to be admitted to candidacy early in the fall semester to be eligible to schedule their final dissertation defense and graduate in the spring; very early in the spring semester for summer graduation; and extremely early in the summer session for fall graduation.  (See the Graduate College Calendar for term-specific dates.) If a student is admitted to candidacy prior to the first day of a given term, all dissertation hours taken that term and following may be included in the hours of dissertation research required as a doctoral candidate.
 
21.11 Dissertation. A dissertation is required of each candidate for the Doctor of Education degree. The dissertation has three principal functions: (1) training in research, (2) promoting professional growth, and (3) contributing to professional knowledge in education. Not every dissertation will be expected to serve these three functions in the same way or to the same extent. 
 
The format specifications, procedures and regulations for the dissertation are the same as for the PhD. The EdD candidate should refer to the "Doctor of Philosophy" section in the Graduate College chapter of the Catalog on dissertations and submission procedures through the Graduate College. The style of the document is to be determined by the advisory committee and should be reflective of publications in the student’s discipline.  Any graduate student is writing a thesis must attend a format workshop prior to submission of their final copy.  The dates for the workshops are on the Graduate Calendar and a webinar version is available.
 
22.0 Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Degree Programs
The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is granted in recognition of high achievement in scholarship and independent investigation. The student must prove his or her acceptability by (1) successfully completing a series of courses comprising a Plan of Study; (2) passing various examinations demonstrating academic competence; (3) carrying out a research program under supervision and preparing an acceptable dissertation; and (4) demonstrating initiative, creative intelligence, and ability to plan and carry out research in his or her chosen field.
 
22.1 Current Degree Inventory
Agricultural Economics
Agricultural Education
Animal Science
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biomedical Sciences
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering
Business Administration (Accounting; Entrepreneurship; Executive Research; Finance; Management; Management Science and Information Systems; Marketing)
Chemical Engineering 
Chemistry 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Science 
Crop Science 
Economics
Education (Curriculum Studies; Educational Technology; Professional Education Studies; Social Foundations of Education, Workforce and Adult Education)
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (Educational Administration; 
Higher Education)
Educational Psychology (Counseling Psychology; Educational Psychology; Research and Evaluation; School Psychology)
Electrical Engineering 
English 
Entomology 
Environmental Science
Fire and Emergency Management Administration
Food Sciences
Geography
Geology
Health, Leisure and Human Performance (Health and Human Performance; Leisure Studies)
History 
Human Sciences (Design, Housing and Merchandising; Hospitality Administration; Human Development and Family Science) 
Industrial Engineering and Management 
Integrative Biology
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics 
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (Unmanned Aerial Systems)
Microbiology, Cell and Molecular Biology 
Natural Resource Ecology and Management (Fisheries and 
Aquatic Ecology; Forest Resources; Rangeland Ecology and Management; Wildlife Ecology and Management)
Nutrition
Photonics
Physics 
Plant Pathology 
Plant Science
Psychology (Clinical; Experimental)
Sociology 
Soil Science
Statistics 
Veterinary Biomedical Sciences
 
22.2 Basic Requirements. The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires the number of credit hours as specified by the degree program with a minimum of 60 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. These hours must include a minimum of 15 dissertation hours (6000) with a grade of “SR”.  The maximum number of dissertation hours (6000 with a grade of “SR”) permissible on a Plan of Study must not exceed three-fourths of the total credit hours in the approved graduate degree program.
 
22.3 Temporary Adviser. At the beginning of a student's doctoral program, the graduate program will designate a member of the Graduate Faculty to serve as temporary adviser to the student. The temporary adviser will assist the student in the early selection of courses. Often, it is the graduate coordinator who serves as the temporary adviser.
 
22.4 Advisory Committee. Upon recommendation of the graduate program and approval of the dean of the Graduate College, an advisory committee of not fewer than four voting members will be appointed. The duties of the advisory committee consist of (1) advising the student, (2) assisting the student in preparing a Plan of Study, (3) assisting in planning and conducting the research, (4) supervising the writing of the dissertation, and (5) conducting the dissertation defense.

The chair of the committee need not necessarily serve as the student’s research adviser, but must hold an OSU faculty appointment, be a member of the Graduate Faculty with doctoral chairing privileges, and have familiarity with the academic requirements of the degree sought. Each doctoral committee must have at least one member of the Graduate Faculty from outside the student's major department. To view the roles and responsibilities associated with members of advisory committees, go to http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/best-practices.

The student should consult the members of the advisory committee frequently and keep them informed on the progress of his or her work.
 
22.5 Preliminary Conference. As soon as the student is notified that an advisory committee has been appointed, the student should arrange with the chairperson for a conference with the committee. During the conference, the preparation and qualifications of the student for graduate work will be discussed and appropriate plans made for future study.
 
22.6 Plan of Study. The student should develop the Plan of Study with the advisor and committee using the online Plan of Study application (http://planofstudy.okstate.edu/). The online submission requires approval by the advisory committee and the student’s graduate program with final approval by the Graduate College. 
 
The original Plan of Study must be submitted to the Graduate College prior to the end of the third semester (excluding summer sessions) of enrollment in the doctoral program. The plan must include all the acceptable graduate work that has been completed and all that will be taken for the doctoral degree.
 
The Plan of Study must include all the acceptable graduate work that has been completed and all that will be taken for the doctoral degree. The Plan of Study should include (1) at least 75 percent of courses taken at the 5000-6000 level, (2) a minimum of 60 hours beyond the master's degree, and (3) a minimum of 15 (maximum of 45) dissertation hours (6000) with a grade of “SR” for the 60 hour doctorate or  a minimum of 15 (maximum of 60) dissertation hours (6000) for the 90 hour doctorate. Courses used to earn a master’s degree are not listed on the doctoral Plan of Study.
Credit for all courses on a graduate Plan of Study must have been awarded within 10 years of completion of all degree requirements. 
 
Changes in the Plan of Study can be made with the approval of the advisory committee and the dean of the Graduate College. A final, accurate and approved plan must be filed by the eighth week of the semester in which the degree is to be conferred. 
 
22.7 Character of Work. The satisfactory completion of course work (see "General Regulations") is only one requirement for receiving the degree. The student must also: (1) pass a qualifying examination, (2) prepare an acceptable dissertation, (3) demonstrate the ability to do independent study, (4) pass a defense of dissertation, and (5) comply with any other requirements of the major department.
 
22.8  Residence Requirements. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be taken at OSU. While the Graduate College does not have a specific residence requirement that applies to all graduate programs, graduate programs may require a period of time in residence for students enrolled in departmental graduate programs. Programs must inform students of any residence requirements upon their admission to their graduate programs.
 
22.9 Language Requirement. Foreign language or other proficiency requirements may be specified to meet the need for specific skills and areas of knowledge that facilitate research and contribute to wider understanding. Specific requirements are determined by graduate programs. In many fields, a reading knowledge of one or two modern foreign languages is an important part of scholarship and necessary for research. In other fields, proficiency in special and related disciplines may be required that will contribute to the needs of the individual program.
 
22.10 Admission to Doctoral Candidacy. Admission to doctoral candidacy marks the transition into the research phase of a doctoral degree and indicates agreement that the student has demonstrated the ability to do acceptable graduate work and that satisfactory progress has been made toward a degree. Consideration for candidacy requires the presentation of a written research proposal for doctoral research to the doctoral advisory committee, who will assess the proposal and offer the student pertinent counsel, advice and feedback. The approval of the research proposal by the advisory committee is the basic requirement for admission to doctoral candidacy; individual programs will normally impose additional requirements, such as the successful completion of oral and/or written comprehensive or qualifying examinations. These additional requirements may occur in conjunction with the presentation of the research proposal, or they may occur at different times within the course of doctoral study. Admission to doctoral candidacy is conferred with the approval of the dean of the Graduate College, on behalf of the Graduate Council, acting upon the recommendation of program faculty. It is the responsibility of the chair of the advisory committee to notify the Graduate College when admission to candidacy is granted by submitting the Admission to Doctoral Candidacy form.
 
22.11 Dissertation Hours Taken as a Doctoral Candidate. Admission to candidacy must occur at least six months prior to the date of the final dissertation defense.
 
Since admission to candidacy may occur at various times related to the academic calendar, the student will need to be admitted to candidacy early in fall semester to be eligible to schedule their final dissertation defense and graduate in the spring; very early in the spring semester for summer graduation; and extremely early in the summer session for fall graduation.  (See the Graduate College Calendar for term-specific dates.) 
 
22.12 Dissertation. A dissertation (doctoral thesis) is required of each doctoral candidate. The subject of the dissertation must be approved by the advisory committee and the dissertation is prepared under the direction of members of the committee or a special dissertation committee approved by the advisory committee chair. 
 
The dissertation must follow specifications in the Graduate College Thesis/ Dissertation Guidelines, available at http://gradcollege.okstate.edu/tdg. The style of the document is to be determined by the advisory committee and should be reflective of publications in the student’s discipline.  Any graduate student is writing a thesis must attend a format workshop prior to submission of their final copy.  The dates for the workshops are on the Graduate Calendar and a webinar version is available. 
 
All dissertation copies must have the necessary approval signatures before submission to the Graduate College.
 
It is strongly recommended that a graduate student submit complete copies of his or her dissertation to the committee members at least two weeks prior to the defense date, that the defense presentation be publicized, and that the dissertation defense occur on a date during the normal academic semesters and sessions. Graduate programs may have additional or more restrictive requirements for dissertation defenses.
 
The student should submit an electronic copy of the dissertation through the OSU electronic submission website. Instructions for on-line submission are given to the student after completion of the National Survey of Earned Doctorates. In addition, the student must submit to the Graduate College one paper copy of the approval page with all original signatures and the student’s name and CWID number entered at the top of the page. Both the electronic submission and paper approval page must be received no later than the stated final copy submission deadline date (see the Calendar at the front of the “Graduate College” chapter for dates).
 
22.13 Final Examination. The student should arrange with the graduate program for the final examination and to distribute a copy of the dissertation as described in the preceding section. The final examination is primarily a defense of the dissertation. If the defense is judged inadequate, a decision on whether to permit re-examination will be made by the advisory committee. Another examination cannot be given for at least two months after a failure, and a graduate program may limit the number of times that the examination may be repeated. 
 
The committee will notify the Graduate College immediately of results of the final examination. Following satisfactory completion of the final examination, the candidate will make changes in the dissertation as required by the committee and by the Graduate College and submit it in final form signed by the committee to the Graduate College by the semester deadline.
 
Please see the Graduate College’s Best Practices: Advisory Committees and Defenses document for additional guidance (https://gradcollege.okstate.edu/best-practices). 
 

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